It's never been easier to buy sneakers on the resale market, but that also means the number of options can be downright overwhelming. How do you resell sneakers?

Sure, you can do your Googles all day long, but unless you really know where to look, you run the risk of getting burnt with replicas, overpaying on a pair that was actually easier to find than you thought, or just getting the wrong product altogether. That's where we come in. 

We've taken into account the recent shifts in reselling and rounded up the best sites to cop shoes on the secondary market today. Whether it's an OG like eBay and Flight Club or the just-launched Sole Collector app, these are the names you should know and trust.—​Riley Jones

Flight Club

Website: flightclub.com

More than a shop, this is an institution. Before venture capital money was pouring into the sneaker resell scene, Flight Club in New York City set the standards for the secondary market. It's still one of the best places to go to unload higher-priced pairs, which fetch more here than on StockX and usually won't sit around for too long. If you have a super-rare Air Jordan collab to sell, this is the place to bring it. For those who can't drop off their sneakers at the store's physical branches, there's an option to mail in your sneakers. —​Brendan Dunne

Stadium Goods

Website: stadiumgoods.com

Stadium Goods opened its doors in 2015 and quickly established itself as one of the premier resale and consignment shops in New York City. It’s since broadened its footprint thanks to an extensive online store, partnerships in China, and financial backing from fashion giant LVMH—before later being acquired by online fashion retailer Farfetch in 2018 with a $250 million valuation. While you can probably grab the latest Yeezy from any of the shops on this list, what makes Stadium Goods particularly noteworthy is its penchant for stocking extremely rare—and expensive—offerings. Also noteworthy is Stadium Goods’ selection, which features hyped streetwear and accessories in addition to sneakers. —​Zac Dubasik

RIF

Website: rif.la

Opening just one year after Flight Club's L.A. location in December of 2006, Rif is an O.G. in the resell game. The consignment-based store is owned by Jeff Malabanan and Ed Mateo and boasts three physical locations throughout California—two in Los Angeles, and another in San Francisco. Rif is known for catering to a who’s who of celebrity clientele, but also takes time to look out for those who are less fortunate by frequently hooking the area’s homeless up with footwear and apparel. With well over ten years of experience to its name, Rif has made its name as a trusted brand for authentic sneakers. You can browse Rif’s deep sneaker inventory online, but also be sure to also visit the store for hard-to-find streetwear from the likes of Supreme, Bape, WTAPS, and more. —​Riley Jones

Sole Supremacy

Website: solesupremacy.com

Sole Supremacy is one of those names you see all over eBay, and they've been doing it for years. The store offers just about everything, from Nike SB to Jordan 1s to Yeezys. You can either buy directly from the site or get something via their eBay page. There will be more than enough to browse through. —​Matt Welty

Project Blitz

Website: projectblitz.com

Looking for the rarest of the rare or even something that released last weekend? Project Blitz is the place. Curated by Andre Ljustina, an infamous collector known as Croatian Style, Project Blitz has long been the spot for high-profile clientele to get their hands on sneakers that are hard to track down or don't exist anywhere else. This includes rare Nike SB Dunks, lasered Air Force 1s, PE sneakers, and one-of-one samples. You can find a pair of Yeezys or the latest Supreme box logo, too. —​Matt Welty

Index

Website: indexpdx.com

Situated in the heart of Nike and Adidas country, Portland’s Index boasts one of the more impressive inventories you’ll find. Along with the expected hyped sneakers like Travis Scott and Off-White collabs, Index also stocks a wide range of rare player exclusives, friends-and-family only pairs, and long-forgotten original colorways. This is the spot for the true connoisseur who’s looking for something that won’t be on everyone else’s feet. —Riley Jones

StockX

Website: stockx.com

If there's an easier app for buying and reselling sneakers than this one, this sneaker writer hasn't discovered it. StockX makes acquiring and getting rid of shoes incredibly easy, although, the company has damaged its rep in the past year with some data breach deceit and that pesky extra fee for buyers. Still, it's hard to ignore how much using this platform makes sites like eBay feel absolutely archaic. Of the biggest resell platforms out right now, StockX is the best for buyers, who can generally find lower prices here than on Stadium Goods or Flight Club. —Brendan Dunne

GOAT

Website: goat.com

When it comes to online marketplaces, there are a few options, and GOAT has emerged as one of the best. Like other players in this field, GOAT uses an auction-like setup and serves as a middleman in transactions, authenticating a seller’s product before shipping it to the buyer. In terms of selection, the platform boasts just about everything one could hope for from the last several years, although its assortment of vintage product may leave something to be desired. —​Riley Jones

eBay

Website: ebay.com

Before the 2010s sneaker resell boom, eBay was the place to buy and sell rare pairs. Many sneaker enthusiasts have abandoned it since in favor of platforms dedicated to sneakers, but it still has its uses. If you're looking for a non-hyped sneaker or a steal on something, go to eBay. Going back and forth with sellers via private messages can be a hassle, but eBay has been cutting fees lately in an effort to keep sneaker consumers on its platform. It also offers worn shoes, unlike many more shoe-focused spots. It may not be as sleek as StockX, but there's still plenty reason to shop here. —​Brendan Dunne

Urban Necessities

Website: urbannecessities.com

Urban Necessities is a relative newcomer in the reselling game. The brand got its start in uncluttered sneaker landscape of the Las Vegas desert before branching out to the much more crowded NYC scene more recently. Founder Jaysse Lopez, aka TwoJsKicks, put his store on the map with a sneaker Key Master game—a claw machine type device that gives customers a chance to purchase plays for a chance to win sneakers. The brand’s online shop offers a wide variety of brands in both new and used condition, as well as streetwear like Supreme and Bape. —​Zac Dubasik

Sole Stage

Website: solestage.com

My momma told me, you better shop around. And that's why it's good that there are so many different secondary market stores out there. Find the right shoes, the best price. Sole Stage is a newcomer compared to places like Flight Club, but the retailer already has locations in New York City and Los Angeles. And it also sells more than just sneakers, with a bevy of streetwear on its site. My Full Size Run co-host Trinidad James said he preferred Sole Stage over Flight Club when it came to getting his G-Dragon x Nike Air Force 1s. The only co-sign I need. —Matt Welty

KLEKT

Website: klekt.com

Looking for something a bit more obscure or live in Europe? KLEKT has long been the marketplace for that. It has Yeezys, Jordans, and the usual fare. But it's also the place to find old New Balance collaborations, ASICS Gel-Lyte IIIs, and more Euro-centric footwear that doesn't come around sites like StockX and Flight Club as often. It's also a buy and sell marketplace, so you can unload unusual sneakers in your collection here. —​Matt Welty

Sole Collector App

Download: iOS

Where is the most comprehensive place to check for prices across all the most popular reselling platforms? Sole Collector's new app, which has a database of almost 40,000 sneakers. Users can search popular pairs with this tool and compare prices for them on StockX, Stadium Goods, and Flight Clubs. Plus, fans of shows like Sneaker Shopping and Full Size Run can buy the sneakers mentioned in their favorite episodes. This is your universal tool for sneaker collecting. —​Brendan Dunne

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