Zack Snyder, whose director's cut edition of Justice League hits HBO Max next month, is the subject of a new book by Sean O'Connell of Cinema Blend. The book, titled Release the Snyder Cut: The Crazy True Story Behind the Fight That Saved Zack Snyder's Justice League, recounts the years-long tale of how the "Snyder cut" became a hot topic among both fans and detractors alike. In a new excerpt published Wednesday, the director shares some candid thoughts in response to "toxic fandom" criticisms.

"I just think that's sour grapes," Snyder said when asked about those who've called the impending release a "win" for toxic fandom. "There's really no other way to say it. We know the people who were the architects of that narrative, and it's pretty obvious what their agenda is. Those are people that I've been held back from confronting, by wiser people in the room."

Snyder went on to say that "some direct conversation would be nice," if only just to—in his words—tell them they "don't know shit." He also said he could "make a list" of things people have said surrounding the film that are, per the director, "wrong."

Later, Snyder lamented what he called "fakers" before arguing that "toxic fandom" criticisms don't make sense given that supporters of the film helped raise substantial funds for a good cause.

"It's just a bunch of BS," he said. "In regards to that toxic fandom, or it's 'a win for toxic fandom,' again, in what world does this 'toxic fandom' raise hundreds of thousands of dollars for suicide prevention? How is that toxic fandom? They've probably achieved more than any other fan base, [and done more] good than any other group. So I don't understand."

As is well-known at this point, Snyder's exit from the original Justice League production was announced in May of 2017, with Snyder and his partner and producer Deborah saying at the time they were taking a break to spend time with family following the death of their 20-year-old daughter. Joss Whedon was brought in to finish production.

Zack Snyder's Justice League, more commonly known as the "Snyder cut," arrives on HBO Max on March 18.