UPDATED 1/21, 6:35 p.m. ET: Co-directors Clarence “Coodie” Simmons and Chike Ozah are readying the three-part Kanye West documentary set to premiere on Netflix in February despite Ye’s emphatic demands to have final approval. The two stopped by the Indiewire Studio for an interview during the 2022 Sundance Film Festival where they got candid about West’s demands: 

“We have to be true to the story. We can’t sugarcoat nothing. Everybody is going to have their own opinion,” Coodie said.

Both jeen-yuhs directors have long-standing friendships with West.  

Chike added, “Every single time, the climaxes were right there. We just had to place them.”

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The artist formerly known as Kanye West has publicly stated he “must get final edit and approval” on the upcoming three-part jeen-yuhs documentary, which is slated to hit Netflix in February following this month’s Sundance premiere.

In an Instagram post shared early Friday, Ye said he was saying this “kindly for the last time,” adding that he wants to be “in charge” of his image.

“I’m going to say this kindly for the last time,” Ye said. “I must get final edit and approval on this doc before it releases on Netflix. Open the edit room immediately so I can be in charge of my own image. Thank you in advance.”

Of course, a key element behind the three-part project from filmmaking duo (and “Through the Wire” video directors) Coodie & Chike in terms of its potential power as a documentary has been the fact that Ye did not have such a hand in the final product. Amid this week’s Sundance coverage, Variety published an interview with Coodie & Chike in which it was noted that Ye is indeed listed as a producer on the doc but “was not given final cut.”

Speaking on this feat, Coodie recalled a conversation he had with Ye. “I said, ‘Dude, you have to trust me.’ And he did, 100 percent,” Coodie said, noting that “[West’s] team and the business people have gotten involved” and are “of course going to have their say.”

As Coodie explained, however, the purpose of the documentary (or, for that matter, any doc) is not to make its subject likable, or the opposite. “What makes the film special is that it’s not something definitive; it’s [Ye’s] journey through my vision,” he said.

Complex has reached out to a rep for Netflix for comment. Below, see the official synopsis for jeen-yuhs: A Kanye Trilogy, which is set to premiere on the streaming platform on Feb. 16:

“A landmark documentary event presented in three acts from Clarence “Coodie” Simmons and Chike Ozah, jeen-yuhs: A Kanye Trilogy is an intimate and revealing portrait of Kanye West’s experience, showcasing both his formative days trying to break through and his life today as a global brand and artist.”

Running concurrently with the coverage surrounding jeen-yuhs are near-constant updates on recording sessions that may or may not result in tracks on a possible Donda sequel. And on Friday, Ye (as seen below) was spotted working with DJ Khaled.

Amid such coverage, a fist-bump with a parenting-complimenting fan has also made headlines.