Jim Jones and Juelz Santana have reunited on a brand new track titled "Still Dipset."

The track is assisted by production from hitmaker Jahlil Beats and sees both popular Dipset emcees trading off verses about their clothes, cars, luxury brands, and more for the duration of the nearly three and a half minute cut. Both rappers deliver impressive showings with Santana providing some memorable bars like, "I see through these n*ggas like they Windex/Keep that bug spray for you insects/Still pushin' weight and I ain't talkin' bout no bench press/5K a day just to get dressed."

He even likens the members of the New York rap collective to the Golden State Warriors. "Splash Brothers/Me and Jim been Steph and Klay/Cam he was KD/Zeke was like Dray Green/Golden days/New York was like Golden State."

Despite the messy relationship between some of the Dipset members since their heyday back in the early-2000s, it is nice to get a nostalgic cut like this one to remind everyone of just how important the group was, and is, for New York's hip-hop culture. It's also refreshing to hear Santana behind the mic given his recent legal troubles involving an incident at Newark Liberty International Airport where he was found in possession of a loaded .38-caliber pistol and oxycodone pills.

Listen to the track over on Apple Music or below via Spotify.

"Still Dipset" will live on Jones' upcoming project Wasted Talent alongside tracks like the Yo Gotti-assisted "Chicken Fried Rice." The project will be out on April 13. 

Following the release of the song, Jones took to Instagram and claimed Supreme owes him, among other rappers, a piece of the company for helping the streetwear brand become what it is now. "Rappers n my black people had no idea wht supreme was we didn't even know wht they was they had tht bag and they new who dipset was," he wrote alongside a photo of him and Juelz Santana posing with Supreme tees on. 

In 2016, Jones spoke with Complex about his issue with Supreme, saying, "We might’ve had the hottest T-shirt they ever did, but they ain’t paying homage. The way I take is that it was a business deal. It was great for the moment but I ain’t get no residuals off of it. You know what I mean? They ain’t paying me no money off of each shirt that they sold, so it is what it is."

Read the interview in full here.