Some of the most influential contemporary artists in the world have come together to help Interscope Records celebrate its 30th anniversary.

To coincide with the landmark anniversary of the record label, Interscope will host over 50 artworks inspired by the musicians on its roster at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Among those who have contributed pieces to the event include Shepard Fairey, Damien Hirst, Takashi Murakami, Kehinde Wiley, Cecily Brown, Rashid Johnson, and Julie Curtiss, among others.

These artists produced pieces inspired by the likes of Dr. Dre, Kendrick Lamar, Billie Eilish, Juice WRLD, No Doubt, Nine Inch Nails, U2, Snoop Dogg, and 2Pac. The exhibit is organized by Interscope co-founder Jimmy Iovine, chairman John Janick, music executive Josh Abaraham, and vice chairman Steve Berman.

“Interscope’s original mission was to find the most profound artists, empower their creativity and watch what happens,” Iovine said in a statement. “For the 30th, we wanted to continue that vision by assembling the most admired visual artists and empower them with that same creative license to honor the musical artists we have worked with over three decades.”

They collaborated with LACMA’s CEO and Wallis Annenberg Director, Michael Govan, who noted that the museum has long curated a selection of album art. “It’s inspiring to see these artists reinterpret three decades of iconic contemporary music,” Govan added. For information about how to attend the exhibit, which starts on Jan. 30, LACMA’s website has more information available.

Check out Kehinde Wiley’s Dr. Dre artwork for The Chronic 2001 in full below, along with Cecily Brown and Rashid Johnson’s work for Billie Eilish’s dont smile at me EP and Kendrick Lamar’s good kid, m.A.A.d city, respectively.

Kehinde Wiley's contribution to Interscope's 30th Anniversary event.
Image via Interscope
Cecily Brown's contribution to Interscope's 30th Anniversary event.
Image via Interscope
Rashid Johnson's contribution to Interscope's 30th Anniversary event.
Image via Interscope