You don’t invite the Twisted Twins into your production and expect anything subtle. Since their lo-fi and madcap 2009 grindhouse-throwback debut, Dead Hooker in a Trunk, Vancouver natives Jen and Sylvia Soska have become mainstays at horror conventions and festivals through their warmly approachable self-branding and filter-free personalities. They also earned the respect of critics worldwide with their 2012 follow-up, American Mary, a graphic yet strikingly tender body horror exercise that’s 100% Soska.

Before they give the slasher genre a spin with this month’s See No Evil 2 (available on DVD/Blu-ray on October 21), the twins have given ABCs of Death 2 a much-needed feminine touch with “T is for Torture Porn,” one of the anthology’s wildest entries. It stars the sisters’ go-to actress, Tristan Risk, and shows what happens when a bunch of sexist male pigs try to get an auditioning actress to service them sexually, only to discover that said actress has been hiding a monstrous secret beneath her dress.

Let Jen, Sylvia, and Tristan themselves elaborate. They do it better than anyone else ever could.

Jen Soska: [ABCs of Death 2] is a real showcase of talent. That’s what great about it—people can watch the segments, find one they love, see the director’s name, and then go look them up and see what else they’ve done. I remember in the first movie, I saw "L is for Libido" and was so fucking amazed and blown away that I immediately looked up Timo Tjahjanto’s previous work. It’s funny, "L is for Libido" was in the manifesto the producers sent everyone before we started working on our films. They didn’t cite that short’s title specifically, but it said, "No penetration of children on camera." I guess people don’t like that [Laughs.]

Sylvia Soska: That manifesto was terrifying. It was seven pages of "You can’t do this," and we already knew we wanted to "T is for Torture Porn," where a woman has tentacles instead of a vagina and fucks people to death! [Laughs.] I was like, "Shit!" We messaged back our producer and said, "Hey, so we wanted to tentacle-rape a bunch of people," and he said, "Sure, go for it!" Little did he know that the blood and semen would be coming out of the fucking asshole. [Laughs.]

Jen: The producer, Mark [Walkow], actually messaged us back and said, ‘Can you put in more anal penetration? Can you make it more horrible?’ I was like, "Mark, you’re the best boss ever." And about that manifesto—we brought it up to Tim [League] after the fact and he said, "What manifesto?" [Laughs.] It was clearly something their lawyer made up.

Sylvia: I definitely wanted us to be towards the end of the alphabet. I think everyone near the beginning has a much harder job, because they have to make something that immediately hits you over the head and is instantly memorable. Like, for example, "D is for Deloused"—that’s one of the fucking best shorts in ABCs of Death 2, but towards the end of it, there’s been so much thrown at you that if it’d been placed near the end of the movie, it might be too much for the audience. There’s definitely a strategy that goes into placing these segments.

Jen: I was hoping that the tone of ours would stand out no matter where it fell in the alphabet. I never wanted to A or Z, because I didn’t want the pressure of opening or closing the movie. Also, our producers told us something really interesting—the first 30 seconds of each segment is basically a write-off. They said, "In the first 30 seconds, don’t do anything too important, because everybody’s going to still be thinking about the segment before yours." Which was super helpful and important. At first, we had a bunch of super-important stuff in ours right away, but I’m glad we listened to the producers, because "S is for Split" is so good and so heavy. You need a little bit of time to come down from it before T really gets going.

Tristan Risk: For a filmmaker, I’d think, working on a movie like this must be like an Iron Chef situation. Like, ‘Here are your limitations, now create something that’s a spectacular cuisine out of the tools you have been given,” and you’re like, "But it’s a giant block of tofu! You know what, it’s not my first choice but I’m going to make this the best fucking four-course tofu meal anybody’s ever consumed!" It doesn’t let you get comfortable as an artist, which is how it should always be. You should never sit on your laurels—you should always push your own envelope; otherwise, you’re going to lose the romance of what you do.

Sylvia: This idea was actually in our heads before the finished the first ABCs. At that point, the first movie’s open letter was T, and we wanted to do ’T is for Torture Porn’ even back then. But then we saw "T is for Toilet" and were like, "Fuck!" It’s so good and deserved to win. And then when we met Ant [Timpson], he said, "If we had asked you to do the first one, would you have done it?" And I said, "Fuck yes!" That’s when he asked us to be a part of the sequel.

Jen: Even though our segment is out-there and crazy, we did want to work in some commentary and meaning, too. Being one of the only female directors in this anthology, we knew there was going to be a spotlight on us, so we wanted to attack some of the issues that affect women in the film industry, like the misogyny and sexual objectification that happen to women in horror. So often, you see female characters in horror movies and their tits come out before you even learn their name. I wanted to exploit the men this time. How often do you see a bunch of men get gang-raped? Not enough, outside of Deliverance.

Sylvia: The back-room castings that happen in Hollywood are some of the most sexually violent thing that happen to women in the industry. You hear about women who get cummed in so much that they have to pump their chests out. I hear about that and I say, "I wish she would just ass-rape some of those guys! Give them a taste of their own medicine." It was so much fun to address that. At the same time, if you just want to have fun and watch it, you can turn your brain off and enjoy the craziness, just like with all of our movies. If you want to sit there and think, too, you can also do that.

Jen: If you beat someone over the head with your message, you’ll turn them off, but if you sneak in your point, it can be really effective. Like in American Mary, we snuck in the message of "Don’t judge people based on how the fuck they look." That’s in there, but it doesn’t feel like an after school special.