Despite the fact that Kanye West has missed key cutoff dates for getting his name on ballots, as well as thus far eschewed practically all of the usual moves that precede a for-real POTUS run, the most ardent supporters of his non-creative pursuits are still treating #2020vision as a viable path.

On Monday, friend and frequent collaborator Chance the Rapper used West's recent sharing of a new song tentatively titled "DONDA" to highlight his issues with the debate surrounding recent developments. Chance, among other things, questioned the "two-party system' and asked if recent West criticism was rooted more in a pro-Biden or merely an "anti-Ye" stance. 

"I finally got the answer now," he said. "I understand. Y'all trust Biden more than y'all trust Ye. I think I understand why, I just don't feel the same way."

Given the seriousness with which the 2020 election should be taken, which is greatly contrasted by the societal weight and barrage of news coverage we as Americans continue to give celebrities, the West-defending portions of Chance's comments on Monday have been met with widespread pushback:

Much of the criticism surrounding West's POTUS-related statements, of course, has centered on the arguable possibility of pulling votes away from Biden as a write-in, a result that could ultimately benefit Trump. Over the weekend, Trump backed this prediction.

As for West, this current era has also included the public sharing of anti-vaxxer and anti-choice comments.

"Black women are free to make our own decisions about our bodies and pregnancies, and want and deserve to have access to the best medical care available," Nia Martin-Robinson, director of Black Leadership and Engagement at Planned Parenthood, said last week in response to West's dangerous comments. "Any insinuation that abortion is Black genocide is offensive and infantilizing."

For a grounded and reflective take on all of this, the following piece comes highly recommended as absolutely essential:

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