“Radioactive (Introduction)”

Produced by: WillPower

Yelawolf: “We had recorded most of the album and I knew I wanted to have an intro for the project. I recorded [this song] when I was gonna do a mixtape for [the album]. We ended up panning the mixtape because we started doing records that we felt like should be on the album.

“The first thing I cut ended up being the intro on the album. We found some ill-ass samples and then pulled my girl Nikkiya in to do vocals. It was a ill vibe to start off the project. It’s kind of a spit-through style with no hook—just kind of opening it up.

“I got a real dark vibe to making records. WillPower can go any direction, but he usually has a darker vibe to his beats. We’ve been working together a long time, so he knows [how to produce for me]. I can hum a melody or explain the style of a beat that I’m looking for, and we’ll work through it in the studio until it’s where we want it.”

WillPower: “I met Yelawolf back in 2000. When I met Yelawolf, he asked me, ‘What do you do?’ I said, ‘I'm a producer,’ and I was like ‘What do you do?’ He was like, ‘I'm a rapper.’ About an hour later we went and cut a record and we've been homies ever since.

 

That was really the biggest ups and downs for us because we never could get a breakthrough financially doing what we was doing. I'm talking about this guy would drive from Alabama to South Carolina and barely have gas money to do it. He'd get there and we'd have to scrounge up money to feed each other. We were really broke man. - WillPower

 

“After I left New York right around 9/11, I went back to South Carolina. At the time, Wolf was about to have his first child. He waited until a week after he had his first child and he and his family got on the bus to South Carolina and we started working. We went through so much like being broke and trying to feed our families and still do music.

“That was really the biggest ups and downs for us because we never could get a breakthrough financially doing what we was doing. I'm talking about this guy would drive from Alabama to South Carolina and barely have gas money to do it. He'd get there and we'd have to scrounge up money to feed each other. We were really broke man. [Laughs.]

“In 2007, I got a phone call from him after I hadn't seen him in maybe a year. He said he got signed to Columbia Records. He called me up to NY, I drove up to there, and he got me on the project. I would say maybe a month later before the album came out, he got dropped. Naturally, we all got bummed out and everybody went their separate ways for a while.

“Yelawolf wanted to be what he is now for so long. He’s one of those guys that won't give up. I just kept seeing Wolf working, kept seeing him doing shows. I saw him go explore a few different ways of working his craft. He kind of went into some rock music and all kinds of stuff.

“One day I was chilling at the crib and he stopped by and we reconnected. He had this idea to go do Trunk Muzik 0-60. He wanted me to pick my studio up out of my house and go down to Alabama with him because he had a week off.

“I packed up my studio and we drove all the way to Alabama from Atlanta. We spent a week working on Trunk Muzik. Trunk Musicbasically happened in the basement of his house. From there everything started to pick up. We dropped the project in January and he got signed to Interscope around March, the deal happened shortly after SXSW. It's just been crazy ever since.

 

We came up with the title Radioactive which has several meanings to it, but one of the meanings is that we can become more active on radio. So we went in with the whole idea of taking this thing global.

 

“The biggest thing that we want to accomplish [with the album] was creating something for the masses. Trunk Muzik was more of a regional vibe, it was more of where we're from and what we hear out here. We always knew that Wolf was capable of doing so much more. When we went into this project as a group, we wanted to make it something that more people could get a hold of.

“We came up with the title Radioactive which has several meanings to it, but one of the meanings is that we can become more active on radio. So we went in with the whole idea of taking this thing global.

“We did a good 85-90% of the album in January. We went there and basically we did two weeks in Vegas and we just killed it. We hooked up with The Audibles and we hooked up with Pooh Bear. And we just went in and locked ourselves in for two weeks.

“With ‘Radioactive Introduction’ we wanted to really catch people’s attentions at the top of the album. With the title being radioactive we were thinking about things like the fall-out and the type of energy that would be in the air if something nuclear were to happen. We wanted to make people feel that intensity and kind of scare them a little. It was really Wolf's idea to come up with something that was just real movie-like. Then he put one of the illest verses on there.”