It appears Lori Loughlin is preparing for a worst case scenario. 

As she battles charges in the nationwide college admissions scandal, the 55-year-old actress has reportedly hired experts to help her survive a possible prison sentence.

"She has someone who is advising her what to do in case she loses her case and goes to prison," a source tells People. "The advisor is there to help her learn the ropes. That’s not to be construed that she thinks she’s going to lose her case. Lori is a planner, and she is doing what she needs to do for all contingencies."

The insider did not give specifics on what kind of advice Loughlin was receiving, simply stating she was trying to avoid etiquette mistakes and essentially lay low as possible.

"The whole point is to have someone tell her how to keep herself safe. She needs to keep a low profile if she’s incarcerated," the source explained. "Obviously, she’s going to stand out, because of all the publicity and because she’s a star. She can’t do anything about that. But she doesn’t want to stand out because she’s so green that she does the wrong things.

"Table manners are different; social interactions are different. Here on the outside, eye contact is a good thing. You meet someone and you shake their hands and stare them in the eyes. In prison, you might not do that," the insider continued. "Prison is a very different world than Hollywood, and Lori is just trying to be prepared. She’s preparing for the worst, but hoping for the best."

Earlier this week, Radar Online reported the Fuller House star is studying martial arts so that she could defend herself behind bars.

"She’s knuckling down, learning the lingo and practicing martial arts to give off the impression she’s tough and to ward off potential bullies," a source said. "[She] knows there will be plenty of them in federal prison."

Loughlin and her husband, Mossimo Giannulli, are accused of paying half a million dollars to get their two daughters, Olivia Jade Giannulli and Isabella Rose Giannulli, into the University of Southern California as fake rowing recruits. The couple was charged with a slew of crimes, including money laundering conspiracy, conspiracy to commit mail and wire fraud, and conspiracy to commit federal programs bribery.

Loughlin and Giannulli pleaded not guilty to all counts. They are now awaiting trial and face up to 45 years behind bars if convicted on all charges.