This week, we're celebrating the rise of Brooklyn drill, an explosive subgenre of rap that has become the new sound of New York. The following story is part of a series of profiles on the scene’s most important figures. Read more here.

Everything about the building where Fivio Foreign lives is extra. The U-shaped apartment complex towers over the small strip malls and gas stations next door. In the front, two golden lion statues flank a set of revolving doors; inside, marble columns frame the extravagant lobby area. The two hallways leading out of the lobby are each lit by a series of large glass chandeliers, giving off a distinct Buckingham Palace-meets-The Sopranos family home vibe. 

We were supposed to meet in Fivio’s apartment, but, because the rapper’s family is there, his manager Jerry leads us to his own apartment a few floors down in the same building. “He basically lives here anyway,” Jerry says. “He comes down here as soon as he wakes up.“ After a few minutes, there’s a soft knock on the door, and Fivio walks in. Aside from the diamond-flooded watch on his wrist, he’s dressed down, wearing a yellow hoodie, black jeans, and slip-on sandals. He immediately lists off the things he has to do today: go to Manhattan to get his chain fixed and then go see a friend in the Brownsville area of Brooklyn who just got out of jail. But before all that, he settles into a tall chair at the kitchen island, mixes weed with crushed Fronto leaf, and rolls it all into a long joint.

Fivio has been living here since last November, shortly after he signed a reported seven-figure deal with Columbia Records. According to Fivio’s publicist, the building has been home to a number of New York rappers over the years who signed record deals but didn’t want to move to Los Angeles. Fivio says it’s been a cool place to live, but he’s already getting noticed and stopped too much for his liking. He’s tried to keep the address private, and many of his closest friends still don’t know where he lives. “They can’t know,” he insists, parting the blinds in Jerry’s apartment to look out the window. But even with the glitzy new apartment, Fivio says, he’s been slow to accept his new reality fully. “I don’t even feel like a rapper,” he says. “Like, it don’t even be hitting me, still.” 

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