Album: Buhloone Mindstate

Label: Tommy Boy

Prince Paul: “It was the same situation. I was like, ‘Maybe it’s time for us to move on.’ And they were like, ‘Nah, let’s just do this album together.’ At that point, I was just like, ‘Yeah, this is my family.’ I do other records, but the records that I really focused on were always De La records, because that was what set me apart from everybody else. Stetsasonic was cool because it gave me my start as a DJ, God bless’em, but this is how people knew Prince Paul. So I had to put a lot of effort in putting this album together.

 

It was nice for The Source to give five mics or whatever, [but] on an overall scale it wasn’t as big of a record as 3 Feet High and Rising. So everything started to decline a little bit, and as the guys got older, they were kind of growing apart. Making this album was not as fun as making the previous two.

 

“I think what made this album a little tougher, especially on the guys, was following up to 3 Feet High and Rising. The second album [De La Soul Is Dead] was regarded as a classic, it was great, but when it came out it wasn’t received as such. Even though, it was nice for The Source to give five mics or whatever, on an overall scale it wasn’t as big of a record as 3 Feet High and Rising.

"So everything started to decline a little bit, and as the guys got older, they were kind of growing apart. Making this album was not as fun as making the previous two. And it wasn’t as many people around, us laughing and giggling. And I attribute that to us growing up. We started our first record as teenagers, and now things were getting real. We were a little more serious on making this record.”

“And I remember, like in most cases it was Pos and I trying to sort stuff out. I like this album a lot because Dave and Maseo made some serious contributions production wise. I mean Maseo has always been there, but it was good for Dave because he took the reins on few songs, and started his imprint as a producer.

“That one Maseo actually came up with the concept. Using that Al Hirt sample just blew my mind. I was like, ‘Yo, we have to make this a little different than what we normally do sonically. So let’s put the vocal through a phaser.’ I didn’t hear any MC around that time that was putting vocals through a phaser. People weren’t using studio effects that much. And I was like—that kind of fit the body of where the beat’s going.

“I remember they were being a little reluctant, because it was different. I don’t know if they thought it’d mess up the way people perceive the rhyme. The engineers always thought it was great. Whenever I came into a studio, the engineers expected the song to be out the norm.

"Especially in hip-hop, how things are recorded, and how things are mixed. So it was always fun for them. But I know the De La guys were a little reluctant at the time. But when they heard it, and they kind of got the idea of where I was going with it, when I tweaked it out right, they were like, ‘Oh, okay. We get it.’

“I remember it had a lot of references to other people’s songs and rhymes. My thing was always feeling the record first, and then listening to the music second. The questions were, “Does the rhyme feel right with the beat? Does it match?” And later I’d go, “Oh, that’s what you’re rhyming about.” Which might be bad in some way, but that’s how it worked.”