Buffalo Wild Wings can’t catch a break.

The popular sports bar issued an apology Saturday after an apparent hacker posted a series of profane and racist messages on its verified Twitter account. The posts included sexual innuendos, pedophilia accusations, and racial slurs, one of which was directed at film producer Tariq Nasheed. The purported hacker(s) also made references to individuals named Tommy and Glove, as well as Madeleine McCann, the British toddler who vanished from Portugal in 2007.

According to the BBC, the offensive tweets remained on the chain’s official page for about 20 minutes before the company deleted them. That was enough time, however, for users to retweet the messages and take screenshots.

Buffalo Wild Wings probably got hacked. But that’s not the story here. The real story is that the racist tweets went massively viral before they got deleted. This showcases the same type of crude trolling power Trump leverages when he makes outrageous statements for his own gain. pic.twitter.com/Lq5qypzUK6

— Eugene Gu, MD (@eugenegu) June 2, 2018

BBW released a statement Saturday, insisting it was taking steps to find the people who were responsible for the tweets.

“We’re sorry that our fans had to see those awful posts, which obviously did not come from us,” the statement read. “We are in touch with our Twitter representatives and will pursue the appropriate action against the individuals involved.”

Well, we were hacked. And it wasn’t funny. We apologize for the awful posts, which obviously did not come from us.

— Buffalo Wild Wings (@BWWings) June 2, 2018

This incident was the second controversy the chain was forced to address this week.

On Thursday, we reported that BWW would give a year’s supply of chicken wings to a Louisiana homeless man who received a disparaging note on his order ticket. The message read: “For homeless fuck! Let sit and get gross.” The company announced that the employee who wrote the note would be terminated.

“It’s embarrassing for this gentleman and it’s very inhumane on the part of the employees,” regional manager Ray Rhodes told the New York Daily News. “It’s not our culture and it’s not who we are.”