Acne Studios is a full-scale label, but die-hard denim fans always go for its jeans. It only makes sense then that founder Jonny Johansson discusses his approach to denim designer. And he did just that, during a recent interview with Style.com, where he also shares his thoughts on Levi's and A.P.C. denim, what he sees for the future of denim, and his take on washing jeans. Read a few excerpts below. 

Talk about the “idea” behind Acne jeans.
"I’m very focused about the word generic. It’s not really about the silhouette [for me]. You could say, 'You should have a pair of ’70s-cut, flared jeans today because the ’70s [are trending].' Yes, that may be so, but I think it’s more about the fabric and how to circle around it. I don’t like what you call the stereotypes of fashion, which would be the flare, the super-skinny. I like a five-pocket [style], and I’m not too much into fancy stuff. And I don’t like vintage. It has to be very straightforward for both men and women; I’m very [into the idea of] unisex."

Do you remember your first pair of jeans?
"
I try to forget the first ones my mother forced me into in the ’70s, but, yeah, I do remember the first pair I decided to have. It was a pair of Levi’s 501s, a straightforward American import. I was 12, maybe 11. Everything else that was available [in Sweden] were copies of Levi’s. It was Levi’s or nothing, for me at least. Our parents were quite heavily influenced by American pop culture, and they channeled it down to us. When I discovered my own aesthetic in terms of design, I remember changing the 501s. I’ve done everything, from changing silhouettes to dyeing. But I still wanted 501s to play with."

Where do you stand on washing or not washing your jeans?
"Oh, I wash. My mother told me to take a shower every day."

When you look around, are there brands you think are doing interesting things in the denim sphere?
"I always like A.P.C. They’ve carved out this timeless zone. They’re never really in and they’re never really out, which I kind of like. And they sort of sprung up in the same period as we did. Not maybe in everything, but regarding the jeans, they’re the brand I like."

What do you see as the future of denim? How important are technological innovations, in terms of stretch, say, to the Acne brand?"
We had success at the start because I developed a denim fabric with a supplier that had stretch. So I’m interested, but I’ve become more and more about the visual, less about the technical. I’m not smart enough. I’m so much about appearance and first impression. I think the technical aspects are very difficult. I’d rather like to be the Hermès of jeans than the North Face."

Visit the Style.com website to read the entire interview.