Early in his retirement life, it seems Kobe Bryant is doing just fine. Kobe wakes up and gets a workout in early, then heads to the office of his Kobe Studios production company in Newport Beach, California. He and his 10 full-time employees spend a lot of time "kicking around ideas," then he casually takes his ideas to a handful of legends: Steven Spielberg, J.J. Abrams, and Jerry Bruckheimer, among others, according to an AP report.

So, Kobe comes up with a movie idea, then dials up Steven Spielberg to talk through the plot. Wouldn't you like to listen in to that call?

"I mean those are like unfair advantages," Kobe said, laughing. "I can pick up the phone and speak to them and ask them questions: 'What do you think about the story? What is this missing?' And they'll nitpick every single detail and I love it."

Kobe was one of the best basketball players alive for 20 years in Los Angeles, seven miles from Hollywood. He met countless actors and directors, and they became friends. These associations, which are now benefiting Bryant as he branches out into film and entertainment, are relationships founded upon mutual respect.

"They respect and appreciate what I've done for 20 years as I respect and appreciate what they've done over the years. And we understand that there is a unifying force between those two things," Kobe said. "Even though the disciplines are different, the commitment, attention to detail is absolutely the same. So even though Steven Spielberg can start speaking in film language and I won't understand a damn thing, I understand the core, the essence of what he's saying."

Kobe's crew is currently working on a 3-5 minute film based on Bryant's famous "Dear Basketball" poem. Kobe is calling upon the services of Disney animator Glen Keane and renowned composer John Williams for the film. The real question is: When will we see a Kobe Bryant-directed movie on the big screen?

Send all complaints, compliments, and tips to sportstips@complex.com