UPDATED 10/2, 4:00 p.m.: Complex received the following statement from a StockX spokesperson in response to last night’s coupon leak and today's subsequent order cancelations.

“At StockX, protecting the integrity of our marketplace is of the utmost importance to us. We recently discovered unauthorized use of a coupon code. As such, we have canceled these orders. We notified all affected customers of this cancellation and are actively working with any sellers who may have already shipped their order. We believe impact to sellers is minimal, as we notified them of the cancellation within hours of the sale. We work hard to create the best possible experience for all of our users and apologize for any inconvenience.”

StockX will only be canceling orders made using the unauthorized code. Shoppers who used it will not be charged full price on impacted orders, but will be fully refunded. Refunds from StockX are typically processed within 3-5 business days.

See original story below.

Recently, StockX has been in the news for making its service more expensive for users, announcing a new $4 shipping fee for sellers that officially kicks in this month. However, last night, the sneaker marketplace was a hot topic on social media for saving its customers money—even if it wasn’t aware that it was doing so.

During the evening, word of a leaked $100 StockX discount began making rounds on Twitter and Reddit. The code, HXOUSETORONTO24, could be added at checkout to receive a $100 discount on any purchase. No limits. No exceptions. Predictably, people went wild with the code as the glitch picked up traction. Some even used it to buy items priced within a $100 range, like Yeezy Slides, so that they were essentially getting them for free.

StockX $100 Code Free Yeezy Slides
Image via Twitter

As the saying goes, if something appears too good to be true, that’s likely the case. This morning, some customers received cancellation/refund notices for purchases made using the code. Instead of acknowledging the error, the e-mails state that the sneakers did not pass through the company’s authentication process. Others say that StockX has or has attempted to charge them full price and that they’re awaiting help from customer service.

The leaked code didn’t just affect buyers. Sellers who believed their item(s) had sold through the platform were also issued cancellation notices. StockX says it’ll take steps to “make it right” for those who’ve already printed shipping labels and/or shipped items.

The code appears to have originally been created for HXOUSE, a Toronto-based, globally focused think-center. This summer, StockX and HXOUSE teamed up for a panel conversation tour in cities such as Toronto, New York, Chicago, Detroit, Miami, San Francisco, and Los Angeles, It’s not clear how the code became public knowledge.

StockX has not responded to our request for comment at the time of this writing.