With the trailer for Jordan Peele's Get Out follow-up Us dropping bright and early on Christmas Day, I figured the rest of the day would be spent with folks theorizing about what Peele's next horror flick would be about in between opening gifts, watching A Christmas Story, and the NBA. What I wasn't expecting was a collective Twitter Watch Party for Bird Box, the ensemble A Quiet Place-esque film that Netflix dropped on December 21 after releasing that intense trailer back in October.

Bird Box—a 2014 novel that was adapted for the screen by Eric Heisserer (who got a Best Adapted Screenplay nomination in 2016 for Arrival) and was directed by Susanne Bier—is a post-apocalyptic thriller about an entity that, when people see it, forces the person who saw it to kill themselves. Sandra Bullock stars as Malorie, who's tasked with saving two children from the entity. Blindfolded, they traverse a desolate American town (and a whole river) to find a safe haven. The film jumps back and forth in time, taking us from When The Shit Goes Down five years ago to the birth of the children to their journey out of town.

The film is perfectly fine. Bullock is a champ, carrying this film (and, at times, those kids), which can get very emotional for a character who is mostly lacking in emotion. Lil Rel gets to be the hero (although he's not as memorable as his role in Get Out), with Trevante Rhodes and John Malkovich doing their things on as well. Hell, MGK is in this, although I'm still trying to figure out where the fuck his character ended up. Either way, this film might've made for a dope episode of Black Mirror if it was shorter, but if you've seen A Quiet PlaceBird Box isn't that far off.

That said, it looks like folks decided to get their Christmas family bonding on while scaring the shit out of themselves via Bird Box. It makes sense; the Christmas season is great for moviegoers—why else do you think Aquaman owned the box office? Whatever the case may be, Bird Box became the talk of the Twitter, especially when it came time for memes. [Ed Note.: Spoilers for Bird Box are below. Proceed with caution.]

For the most part, people broke down what it's like whenever they heard weird noises, birds, or rustling leaves.

Others prepped for stepping outside in a post-Bird Box world.

The best meme, without a doubt, is imagining how the folks at the school for the blind at the end of the film were during the entire ordeal.

This is Netflix's vibe, though; creating content that is dissected and discussed (and, hopefully, meme'd) by everyone with a Netflix account. When that does happen, you get these viral moments, regardless of how well the project might be received by critics (Bird Box is currently sitting at a 67 percent on Rotten Tomatoes, btw). Maybe we're post-reviews. Maybe "did it get dank memes" is the new review system.

If you still haven't seen the film yet, don't fret. You still have time to hop on the Bird Box meme bandwagon; it's streaming right now only on Netflix.