The internet can be a cruel and unforgiving place. ASAP Rocky learned this the hard way after some social media users decided to kick him while he's down over his past comments. 

During a recent conversation with Kerwin Frost, Rocky touched on his jail time in Sweden. Rocky explained how his friends were keeping him in tune with public opinion regarding his situation, including those who suggested that he deserved to be in jail due to the comments he made about the Black Lives Matter movement. 

"I thought I addressed that in the past and to be in jail hearing people still trying to stir up some weird shit," Rocky said at the interview's 52:52 minute mark before explaining what he meant by his past statements. 

"What I will say though is in those old interviews I used to say 'I think it's inappropriate for me to rap about things I didn't help with,'" he continued. "I felt like when it came to Ferguson, J. Cole went down there and he actually was on the news and he helped. I felt like he deserved to rap about it. So when someone ask me that in 2015 I'm like: 'I just feel, personally, if I'm in SoHo or I'm here I can't even talk on that'... That's appropriating. ... It's not sincere. It's pretentious."

Rocky also explained his state of mind while in prison and how advice from people like Meek Mill helped him put the situation in perspective.

"I think what happened was real unfortunate. Wrong place, wrong time type shit," he said. "I was talking to Meek, I was talking to a few people and they were like 'It goes to show you that even with money that shit can happen to you.' That experience just had me in jail thinking like 'Was I wrong? Damn, maybe I am wrong. Damn, maybe it is my fault.' You be in solitary confinement for so long." 

Along with his legal issues, Rocky looked back on his roots. The rapper and ASAP Mob caught the mainstream media's attention with 2011's "Peso" video. Shortly after this, tension started to raise with his close collaborator, SpaceGhostPurrp. Rocky admits that Purrp taught him how to produce records, but he didn't give him credit for influencing his rapping style or fashion sense. 

"When he left, we was all on great terms," Rocky said when describing how being homesick prompted Purrp to return to Florida. "Next thing I know drama started and he started telling niggas that I only tried to give him $50 thousand and sign him and I gave everyone in ASAP $500 thousand to sign and I'm like 'Nigga, I'm not no major label. How I'ma give everybody $500 thousand?'"

A person who had a lasting impact on Rocky was the late ASAP Yams. Yams introduced Rocky to Purrp and was known for having an eye for talent. Rocky describes Yams and his innate abilities as being a "magical creature."

"He introduced me to a world and people that I never knew," Rocky said. 

Another person that went to what Rocky calls the "University of Yamborghini" was Ian Connor. Connor is one of the ASAP members that has been embroiled in a lot of drama. More than 20 women have accused him of rape and/or sexual assault. He's also gotten into viral fights and other incidents. Despite this, Rocky stands by his protege. 

"I heard of people doing some real fucked up shit," Rocky told Frost. "I  can say that he gets picked on more than people think. A lot of it is cyberbullying." 

Rocky's condemnation of cancel culture extends past himself and members of ASAP. After expressing his love for Sheck Wes, Rocky practices restraint before passing judgment on the rapper due to the abuse accusation made against him by ex-girlfriend Justine Skye. 

"Everybody want to cancel him... all this other shit," Rocky said. "I fucks with Justine Skye. I like Sheck Wes as a musical artist. I don't know what happened with that situation. I really hope that they figure it out. I wasn't there. I hope that they figure that out."  

Rocky also touched on the reception of his 2018 studio album, Testing, comparing the project to Kanye West's Yeezus. He acknowledged that the project wasn't an initial hit, but has noticed that many of his fans are starting to appreciate it.

"It’s like you either love it or hate it. That’s one of those experiments. That was like my Yeezus," he said. "... My cult following, I think they get it, they love it. I don’t wanna put out nothing that’s fucking contemporary. They be mad at me for that because they know how easy it is for me to get on a song and say what they want me to say, but what I choose to do with my art you gotta appreciate. Listen I look at it like this, bro. I feel like if I listen to what everybody tell me to do I’m gonna be fucking confused bro. I'ma do what I want and what feel right."