Thousands Evacuate Philippines as Typhoon Noru Hits Island

Philippines President Ferdinand Marcos declared suspension of government work and classes as Typhoon Noru slammed into the northeastern Philippines on Sunday

People secure their boats in Baseco, Manila as Typhoon Noru approaches the Philippines on September 25, 2022.
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Photo by JAM STA ROSA/AFP via Getty Images

People secure their boats in Baseco, Manila as Typhoon Noru approaches the Philippines on September 25, 2022.

Typhoon Noru blasted the Philippines on Sunday, prompting thousands to evacuate the island of Luzon toward the capital Manila.

NBC News reports the powerful typhoon, which had sustained winds of 121 miles per hour and gusts of up to 149 mph, hit the coastal town of Burdeos on Polillo Island in Quezon province. Nearly 8,400 people wereevacuated from the path of Typhoon Noru, Reuters notes

“The combined effects of storm surge and high waves breaking along the coast may cause life-threatening and damaging inundation or flooding,” the weather agency warned.

🚨 BREAKING: #TyphoonNoru winds have increased by 150kph in 12 hours, of which 110kph increase occurred in a 6 hour period. This storm will catch people off guard in #Philippines I have never seen a typhoon undergo "extreme rapid intensification" #TyphoonKarding (local) @CNN pic.twitter.com/Gm3ie9s6TQ

— Derek Van Dam (@VanDamCNN) September 25, 2022

People went to sleep Saturday night in the #Philippines anticipating a manageable tropical storm. They woke up Sunday morning to a monster staring them in the face. #TyphoonKarding #TyphoonNoru @cnnphilippines @cnni pic.twitter.com/RIjHTml1TM

— Derek Van Dam (@VanDamCNN) September 25, 2022

“The typhoon is strong and we live by the sea,” 50-year-old Marilen Yubatan, who left their shanty with her two young daughters, told NBC. “If we fall into the water, I don’t know where I will end up with my children.”

Weather experts predict that coastal communities could be hit by tidal surges as high as 3 meters (about 10 feet) in Quezon province, with more than 1,000 houses and a large number of roads already flooded.

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