The NRA is about to get hit where it hurts the most: their bottom line. If conservative politicians can’t be relied upon to sever ties with the organization, it appears that certain corporate partners can. In the wake of the Parkland, Florida shooting that claimed 17 lives, various companies announced that they were cutting their partnerships with the NRA on Friday.

The nation’s largest privately owned ban, First National Bank of Omaha, tweeted, “Customer feedback has caused us to review our relationship with the NRA,” a bank spokesman said in a statement. “As a result, First National Bank of Omaha will not renew its contract with the National Rifle Association to issue the NRA Visa Card.”

First National had a 10-plus year relationship with the NRA. The NRA Visa card featured a $40 cash-back bonus, which is enough to cover a one-year NRA membership. The bank isn’t the only company cutting ties, however. The parent company of car rental brands Enterprise, Alamo and National, Enterprise Holdings Inc., also announced that it’s quashing its program that gave NRA members discounts next month.

Hertz has joined them as well.

While the announcements will (and ought) to be lauded by many, given the divisiveness of the gun control debate, they are sure to be met with some criticism. As Matt Schulz, a senior industry analyst at CreditCards.com in an email to MarketWatch:

“Many will applaud the move, but NRA members are famously loyal and the organization has shown itself as being very good at mobilizing its members, so there’s a real possibility of a significant backlash. However, banks are in the business of managing risk of all kinds, and First National clearly sees this as one they’re willing to take in the wake of the tragic school shooting in Florida.”