Moving To Los Angeles

Iggy Azalea: “I moved to L.A. in August 2010. I moved to L.A. because I put this video on YouTube, and these guys from Interscope, Neil Jacobson and George Robertson, found it and called all of my friends because they couldn’t get my number. They would tell my friends, ‘Please, will you tell this girl to call us.’ My friends said, ‘They’ve been calling us for weeks, but we don’t know who they are.’ I said, ‘Probably some scammer.’

“They kept trying to find me for weeks. I eventually called and they flew out from L.A. We had a meeting and they were like, ‘You have to move to L.A.! We want to manage you, but we can’t manage you from Atlanta.’ I was like, ‘Nah. I don’t want to move to L.A.’

 
So there was always a fight with my manager where they would be like, ‘Be more this.’ I would be like, ‘No. I want to be rap. I want to do hip-hop.’ They’d be like, ‘That’s the hard way. Why do you want to do that? It’s not crossover.’
 

“Even though I had never been to L.A., I didn’t want to go to Hollywood. So I didn’t move for like six months. Then things weren’t really moving in Atlanta, i was kind of in a rut, and my lease was up. So I was like, ‘Fuck it, I’m going to move to L.A.’ I’ve been here since. They manage me still and that’s why I’m here.

“When I moved to L.A., my managers thought it would be cool if I was more pop and more crossover. So we had fights for six months. They’d take me around to people that were more pop and say, ‘Try to rap over these beats. This is what’s going to be cool. Try to do it.’ I just couldn’t fucking do it and I don’t like doing it.

“I told them I didn’t like the music and that it wasn’t what I had in mind for myself. So there was always a fight where they would be like, ‘Be more this.’ I would be like, ‘No. I want to be rap. I want to do hip-hop.’ They’d be like, ‘That’s the hard way. Why do you want to do that? It’s not crossover.’

“I understand why they would say that, but I got so sick of it so I was like, ‘I don’t want to work with you guys anymore. Fuck off.’ I didn’t speak to them for about three weeks. They were like, ‘If you want to do it the hard way, fine. We can’t help you.’ I was like, ‘Okay, whatever.’

 
WorldStar emailed me back like, ‘Do you model? Oh, you rap? So you’re trying to go the hard way? We’re not putting your video on. Your video will have to get at least 80,000 views for free, or you can pay me $850. Or we’ll put it on for free if you make it a sexy song.’ I was like, ‘Fuck off.'
 

“That’s when I made ‘Two Times’ and ‘Hell of A Life’ freestyle videos. In my mind, I was like, ‘I’m going to get this on WorldStar and somebody will see it. They’ll put it on WorldStar, right?’

“WorldStar emailed me back like, ‘Do you model? Oh, you rap? So you’re trying to go the hard way? We’re not putting your video on. Your video will have to get at least 80,000 views for free, or you can pay me $850. Or we’ll put it on for free if you make it a sexy song.’

“I was like, ‘Fuck off. People are going to think I’m a fucking WorldStar bunny. I’m not doing that shit. That would defeat the purpose.’ So I messaged them like, ‘Fuck you guys.

“I put my videos on regular YouTube and my old managers saw them. They were like, ‘Whoa. This is cool. We couldn’t understand it before, but now we get it.’ I signed a management deal like two weeks later and we’ve been working together since then.”