The Making of T.I.'s "Trap Muzik"

"Be Easy"

Producer: DJ Toomp

T.I.: “'Be Easy' was a term that me and my partner just started saying back in the day. A lot of the shit on that record was just things that me and my partner would say. It just made its way into my music.

“I wanted to make people feel about me and that record the same way that people felt about Black Sheep when they came out. The laid-back, cool... Cause I ain’t one of those other cats out here. That was my sole purpose with that particular record, to separate myself from the rest. Like, this ain’t that.”

DJ Toomp:“I took a little piano sample from Al Wilson’s ‘Somebody To Love,’ and chopped it up and put beats behind it. 'Be Easy' was the beginning of a lot of things. Shawty Redd, that’s his favorite song. When you listen to a lot of Jeezy’s stuff on his first mixtape, a lot of what Shawty Redd was doing, he got the pattern from the 'Be Easy' drum pattern. It’s good to know that it had such an influence on a project like that.”

 

Shawty Redd, that’s his favorite song. When you listen to a lot of Jeezy’s stuff on his first mixtape, a lot of what Shawty Redd was doing, he got the pattern from the 'Be Easy' drum pattern. - DJ Toomp

 

Jason Geter: “'Be Easy' was the record company’s pick at the time. They were like, 'Hey, let’s go with ‘Be Easy’ after ‘24s.’’ We were getting the new relationship with a major label. But 'Rubberband Man' came after 'Be Easy,' which totally started taking a life of its own and then we got forced into doing 'Rubberband Man' immediately. 'Be Easy' wasn’t even around that long, honestly.

“The reason why we decided to go with Atlantic Records was because they didn’t have anybody that was dominating. We looked and we saw they had Nappy Roots. I said, 'Man you guys gave Nappy Roots four videos?' I said, 'If we go over there, you could really run this building.’

“But they’re not like Def Jam. They never had that practice of throwing a lot of money out there. It’s really like a conservative approach. That’s why the album had that slow burn is because it was organic, grassroots. It wasn’t this huge marketing campaign, which is what we saw from some of our peers.

“We saw Bone Crusher have the hit record at radio and the huge campaign. But that just wasn’t Atlantic’s style of doing business. It was more, 'Instead of dumping a whole load of money on one record, we’re gonna stretch this money out and we’re gonna do four records.’ That’s why the album was real gradual.”

Tags: the-making-of, ti
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