25 Notable Extremes Musicians Were Driven To By Drugs

David Bowie Thinks Witches Are Stealing His Semen

In fall 1975, David Bowie went into the studio in Los Angeles and made Station To Station, one of the best albums of his career. It saw him transition from playing conventional if fantastic rock and roll to recording a series of genre-bending masterpieces that set a template for '80s pop and whose influence is still being felt decades later. Pretty impressive, considering he was doing so much coke at the time he later couldn't remember recording the album at all.

According to David Buckley, the author of the book "Strange Fascination: David Bowie: The Definitive Story," Bowie's diet at the time consisted of cocaine, peppers and milk, and he lived in "a state of psychic terror." Interviews published in Playboy and Rolling Stone depicted Bowie surrounding himself with burning black candles and Egyptian artifacts and believing that bodies were floating past his window, witches were stealing his semen and that the Rolling Stones were sending him secret messages. He lived in fear of Led Zeppelin guitarist Jimmy Page, owing to his supposed practice of witchcraft. In Station To Station's title track, Bowie yelped, "It's not the side effects of the cocaine; I'm thinking that it must be love," which was definitely the wrong diagnosis.

If Bowie wanted to clean up after this album, he made the wrong move by decamping to Berlin with Iggy Pop. Still, the trio of albums he recorded during this period—Low, Heroes and Lodger—honed his legacy. This trilogy along with Station To Station was cherry-picked to create a perfect soundtrack for Christiane F. We Children from Bahnhof Zoo, a German film released in 1981 that captured the harrowing lives of teenage junkies in West Berlin.

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