Who Is SpaceGhostPurrp?

Influences

SpaceGhostPurrp: “Down here we grew up on The Hot Boyz, No Limit, Trick Daddy—the real Trick Daddy when he was bald-headed and shit—we grew up on that Mystikal.

“I'm gonna break it down by region. East Coast it was: Group Home, Wu-Tang, The Firm, Junior M.A.F.I.A., The Fugees, Bad Boy, Gravediggaz. There were so many groups coming out of the East Coast.

 

I met GZA in person two weeks ago and I'm gonna be a man about it—I was nervous. But it was a good nervous, it was a proud, happy nervous. It was like, ‘I cannot believe that I'm standing next to someone who inspired me, someone who spit the realest.'

 

“As far as the South, of course No Limit, Cash Money, Rap-A-Lot, Hypnotize Minds, Profit Posse, Slip-N-Slide Records. Midwest: Twista, Crucial Conflict, Da Brat, Do or Die. West Coast: N.W.A., Compton’s Most Wanted, Death Row, Dogg Pound, and South Central Cartel.

“The O.G.s always say, ‘The rap game is fucked up, it’s changed, it’s watered down.’ I said it’s not that, it’s just that I always felt that my generation should have our chance to shine. When I say generation, I speak for all of the ‘90s babies and some of the late ‘80s babies.

“I don’t know too much about the ‘80s babies rappers, but I do know that all of the groups that are coming out now are ‘90s babies—like Odd Future, Raider Klan, and all of the other groups that are coming out. It’s a new generation.

“I met GZA in person two weeks ago and I'm gonna be a man about it—I was nervous. But it was a good nervous, it was a proud, happy nervous. It was like, ‘I cannot believe that I'm standing next to someone who inspired me, someone who spit the realest shit.’ Niggas don’t even know that when Wu-Tang dropped ‘C.R.E.A.M.’ that niggas in Miami was on the same shit.

“My dad put me on to Wu-Tang. That’s all he knew because he was the same way. My dad’s name was Dirt Dog, like Dirt McGirt. That’s crazy because I love ODB. He loved them niggas because he felt like the only nigga on Earth that was misunderstood. When those niggas came out, it was all he played because he felt like he could relate to them.

“When I saw GZA, I saw my father. When I met him, it was a dream come true. He said his son introduced him to my music and he liked it. I was like, ‘Damn that’s crazy.’ That’s a huge compliment.”

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