Learning to Rap

“I wouldn’t dare freestyle as a kid. I didn’t even know what that was. I would just always write poems. And the poems would turn into raps. And then when the raps started turning into something I wanted to record, it was around the time of 6th grade.

 

The first time I ever put a song together, I was sitting in the barbershop in the chair getting a cut, and I saw this girl walk by, and a song just came into my head, like a melody. And I put it on paper.

 

“I had this friend, he was my best friend at the time. He sang, and I rapped, and we formed a little group. That’s when I really realized like, ‘Hey, I want this dream of rapping.’ But time went on, and we went to different schools, and I was exposed to different things, because I went to a more diverse school. It opened my mind up to different aspects of the world, music being the dominant one. It changed my way of seeing things, and made me want to express [myself] differently.

“The first time I ever put a song together, I was sitting in the barbershop in the chair getting a cut, and I saw this girl walk by, and a song just came into my head, like a melody. And I put it on paper. That was the first hook I ever wrote. And I structured my first song from there, with three verses and a hook. I even threw in a little bridge. I was like nine or ten [years old]. It was about something that I’d rather not share. [Laughs.] It was kind of embarrassing.

“From there, when I got the opportunities to do projects or contests [that had to do with songwriting, poetry, or rapping] I would take advantage. Like little Poetry Slams and things like that. I would capitalize on it anytime I got the free time, and even cheating time, while I was supposed to be doing something else. That’s how my love for [rapping] grew.