Slim On L.A. Rap Life

Slim The Mobster: "When you talk about that, you got to remember we are a territorial place. The gang situation and all those things tend to spill over into the music. You can’t worship two gods, meaning when you become serious about one thing, you gonna be less serious about another. If you feel like you’re serious about both in the same way, then it’s a conflict of interest.

"I feel like that’s somewhat of our problem [in the L.A. rap game]. A lot of the dudes that parade around doing this and doing that, it’s not even them. Anybody that knows me personally knows that.

 

A lot of dudes feel like they need to prove themselves, but if your name ain't ringing bells in the street from a few years back, what are you doing? I don't want to be the rapper that goes to jail now that I'm on.

 

"I’m not a person that walks around with an ego or a chip on my shoulder. I’m a cool dude until otherwise. A lot of dudes feel like they need to prove themselves, but if your name ain’t ringing bells in the street from a few years back, then what are you doing?

"I don’t want to be the rapper that go to jail now that I’m on. I did that before [the fame]. When I look at rappers that go to jail when they got the opportunities, I look at that like, ‘Damn, I don’t want to be like that.’ I had enough of that.

"I already [been to prison]. I don’t want that to be a part of my career like ‘Oh he’s the rapper that always goes to jail.’ I couldn’t be known as the nigga off of Flavor Of Love or I Love New York. I couldn’t do it. Those type of things I pride myself too much on.

"With the gang thing, I don’t want to talk about it and give it life. People ask me those questions all the time and I tell them the same thing. I don’t want to be known as the dude from this block. When you get my mixtape, sit down and listen to it, you probably gonna hear “crip” one time on the whole entire CD. I feel like music means more to me than gang-banging.