My guess is that a lot of fathers of professional athletes have disagreements with the way their kids are coached. It's just that those fathers don't have the appetite for attention that LaVar Ball does, and thus their opinions may be reserved for private conversations with friends and family instead of generating headlines by revealing those opinions to a national media outlet.

However, as we all have had beaten into our heads by now, that's not how LaVar Ball rolls. And all those terrible think pieces that proclaimed him a genius for taking the attention off No. 2 pick Lonzo (which was a stupid premise that never made any sense, by the way) were staggeringly myopic, even by the standards of this generation of overrated internet blowhards.

Because of the attention LaVar has attracted to himself and his children, we get narratives like the one in this new Bleacher Report article highlighting the differences between L.A. Lakers coach Luke Walton and LaVar (who's just a freakin' player's dad at the end of the day) when it comes to developing Los Angeles' young roster.

Here are a few excerpts that highlight the difference in philosophy between Walton and LaVar, starting with Luke's learn from your mistakes mindset:

Walton’s focus day to day must be on winning, but to do so, he needs to let his young players make mistakes while gaining the experience they need to succeed.

“The line is there and you walk that line every day because you need to encourage them to have the confidence in themselves,” Walton said. “When they’re at this stage of their careers, [sometimes] you have to point out that that’s not how you do different things.”

Then there's LaVar, whose AAU coaching experience makes him qualified to critique NBA coaching staffs, saying the Lakers are going too soft on his son (though he did add he has no problem with Walton):

"They're soft. They don't know how to coach my son. I know how to coach him," LaVar Ball said. "I tell him to go get the victory. Stop messing around."

Does he have a problem with coach Luke Walton?

"No, I have a problem with losing," Ball responded.

LaVar also seemed to imply the franchise was being far too patient with their young team, and that they should feel more pressure to win now regardless of their youth:

"What I mean by babying [Lonzo], 'He'll figure it out,'" Ball said. "It ain't about that. 'Be patient with him?' Ain't no patience if you're winning."

"They're letting it go too easy, saying they're a young team," he continued. "Forget about that! Put the [onus] on them. Say, 'You guys need to win. You've got enough talent. Win some games.'"

He also shat upon the idea of L.A. walking away with any "moral victories":

"When you're [playing] at home you don't lose. It ain't OK," said LaVar, who implied the players shouldn't take moral victories in defeats. "That's why they're so cool with losing by five or six, [to] say, 'We was in the game.'"

In all honesty, considering all the news that's surrounded LaVar this week, this is actually pretty tame by comparison. Still, though we know it'll never happen, it would be wise to throw a "no comment" in there on occasion.