Who Is Rich Homie Quan?

His mixtapes, Still Goin In and Still Goin In (Reloaded)

Rich Homie Quan: “My first mixtape, I Go In On Every Song, came out in—what year is this? 2013? So, 2012, the beginning of 2012. I dropped that mixtape by myself. I didn’t go through the process of putting it together, it was just when I wanted to drop it. I could’ve put it together, because over that time I probably had like 100 songs, so it was me just picking from the list. I probably could’ve done it in about two weeks. I had a lot of songs, I put it together, and got a good little response from it. But I just wanted to see what people were gonna think really. It buzzed up a little stir.

“After I Go In On Every Song, I dropped Still Goin In. Still Goin In came out with a big stir. It was the 'Differences' song that got everybody attention at first. Then we came, we dropped the 'Differences' video, we came back to [Still Goin In (Reloaded)] the same day and had four new tracks including 'Type Of Way.' 'Type Of Way' just took off. 'Type Of Way' shattered 'Party,' but I feel like when Type Of Way' dies it’s gonna make 'Party' bigger than life. 'Party' was the one we thought would blow up at first.

 

We rented out a studio and had a listening party. We got sheets printed out with all the songs and a tally mark, and we would let the people pick. So out of 60 songs, those were the songs they liked the most.

 

“It wasn’t even really a track, it was the whole mixtape, Still Goin In. When we dropped it, we put out 10,000 CDs—BET weekend, when they came to Atlanta. Out of 10,000 you got to think like, even at 10,000, you know 10,000 people ain’t gonna listen to em. Look, 3,000 might get them in the right hands. That’s just being real. From then, it’s them not picking any particular songs, it was the whole mixtape. Everybody had their own favorites.

“The way we picked out the songs was so different. We didn’t even pick out the songs, really. I don’t know if anyone has done it, but what we did was, since my first mixtape to the time before Still Goin In, I had probably done about 60 songs. What we did was, we burned three CDs and put all the songs on there and rented out a studio and had a private listening party. Well, it wasn't so private—we told everybody to come. [Laughs] We got sheets printed out with all the songs and a tally mark, and we would let the people pick. So out of 60 songs, those were the songs they liked the most. So I can’t go wrong if I leave this in, this what they want to hear. I had songs about cars, songs about girls, and when they picked, they wouldn't want to hear the real pain music. That’s what they wanted, so that’s what we started to do.”

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