Who Are The Underachievers?

Linking Up With Flying Lotus

Issa Dash: “We were getting Twitter followers [after our first video dropped], and I got one Twitter follower, and I don’t even know why I looked into her thing, but the username was @1111Agency. I’m really big on the numbers 11-11 so I was like, ‘I’ll just follow this lady.’ And as soon as I followed her, she messaged me, and we just started talking about a whole bunch of spiritual, mystical shit, throwing ideas back and forth. Then she was like, ‘I’m going to show you to some of my friends.’ I was like, ‘Oh alright, sure, whatever, you can do that.’ She’s like, ‘My friend Steve.’ And I’m like, ‘Cool, whatever.’ [Laughs.]

“She showed it to Steve, and people at BBC Radio. We got played on BBC Radio mad early, like in August. I had the tweet. ‘BBC Radio, The Underachievers, ‘Gold Soul Theory.’’ And then a day later, [she told me Steve] was Flying Lotus, and I was like, ‘Oh shit.’

 

It’s so funny how all these coincidences happen. Some dude went out of his way to show me Flying Lotus like six months ago, and he was like, ‘Check out this dude.’ And he showed me his beats, and he was like, ‘This dude never works with rappers ever. He doesn’t like rappers.’ And I’m like, ‘Alright.’ Then six months later, he signs us. - Issa Dash

 

“[We were up on him], but not really ridiculously. I knew of him. I knew of him as this mystical, no-face character who made these beats and threw these secret beat parties in L.A. It was this weird character that was completely not [who] Flying Lotus [actually is]. I mean he’s definitely that guy, but like [not once you get to know him].

“I remember specifically the person who put me on to Flying Lotus. It’s so funny how all these coincidences happen. Some dude went out of his way to show me Flying Lotus like six months ago, and he was like, ‘Check out this dude.’ And he showed me his beats, and he was like, ‘This dude never works with rappers ever. He doesn’t like rappers.’ And I’m like, ‘Alright.’ Then six months later, he signs us. [Laughs] My friend was just like, ‘What the fuck? I showed you this dude and you weren’t even really into him.’

“He called us and was like, ‘Let me hear a couple more songs.’ He’s like, ‘I love everything but let me hear some more songs.’ We sent him some more stuff, a couple early songs. He liked it, and he just flew us out there to do a show. We did a good job at the show, and it was my second show ever. It was Low End Theory, that’s where he came up in. It’s a beat show but if you’ve ever seen a video of us performing, like destroying this place, it was Low End Theory. We went back six months later, not famous, but more known, and [we did really well].

“[But he still] didn’t sign us yet. We flew back over. I remember I texted him before I got on the plane like, ‘Yo, where’s the contract?’ And he was like ‘I’m going to send it to you, we've got to work out the details.' It was my birthday, and it was amazingly sick. [We recorded a song with him while we were out there, but] it was garbage. It’s not a bad song, just we want our first song to be way better than that. We had it for this project, but he was like, ‘Why not just do this project yourself. Give them this project yourself.’

 

That’s why we didn’t have features on [our first project], too, because we didn’t want to get oversaturated with features that people expected. - Issa Dash

 

“Our first single after this project is probably going to be FlyLo, but we can get FlyLo beats like, ‘Yo FlyLo send us 10 beats.’ He’ll send me 10 beats from his computer. So it’s not hard to get the beats. But you want to make it a good song and actually take advantage of the feature of having him on the beat so it can stand alone as a single. That’s why we didn’t have features on [our first project], too, because we didn’t want to get oversaturated with features that people expected, like Zombies, and Pro Era, and World’s Fair and all those type of dudes.”

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