"'Cause I was cool with 50, I heard it a little early. Like maybe two weeks early. And those guys were my friends. If you remember, I produced the "Fuck You" song, so we were already cool. And like I said: I've known 50 since he was with Jam Master Jay. 

"So I was hearing the music when it was happening. I just thought he had actually put together a super solid body of great songs. To me, with 50, it's not about the rhymes, it's about the songs. And his song-making ability was so ill that when I first heard it, I was like 'That's really, practically, a perfect album.'

"My favorite song, funny enough, on that album: "If I Can't." When I heard that, I was like 'Oh my god that's just like the insanity.' Of course, "In Da Club" was what it was, "Wanksta" had already been doing what it was. But when I heard "If I Can't" I was like 'That shit is just stupid.' And it just sounded so angry, and super clean.

 

First time I played 'In Da Club,' I think I played it like eight times in a row. I had a super early pressing of the record, and I just wore the shit into the club that night.

 

"First time I played 'In Da Club,' I think I played it like eight times in a row. I had a super early pressing of the record, and I just wore the shit into the club that night. It's just such a mean record. The energy on it made you...It's like you had no choice but to like it.

"It's not like he was trying to sell out. Imagine you go to a club, and there's a bunch of super-thugs, but when your record comes on, and you're singing in the record, these thugs are singing the record with you. They're ghetto sing-a-long records. He mastered that shit.

"Because of how much of a monster his first album was, it almost set him up to never be that successful again musically. It was too crazy. Like, even the G-Unit album that came out after that was really crazy. But the thing is, it was too big, too fast. Everything was too good, too fast. "