DJ Clark Kent Tells All: The Stories Behind His Classic Records (Part 1)

Chubb Rock "The Chubbster (Remix)" (1991)

Album: The One

Label: Select

DJ Clark Kent: “Trackmasters did the [original version], but the remix is the one that worked. It was the one that went to video, and that hit the clubs real heavy. I did two versions of it, a hip-hop version and a house version.

"It’s funny because the house version was extremely big, especially in house clubs. But then again, back then, you could go to a club and hear all kinds of music. So when you got to a house version, it wasn’t confusing to kids, because they heard house music in the party anyway.

 

What they’re doing now is not really remixing. If they’re not changing the music, that’s just re-vocaling and throwing [guest verses on the song].

 

“Back then, they didn’t re-verse, they re-mixed. We had to go in to the studio and make the whole record over with the vocals that were given. It wasn’t like, ‘Chubb Rock, come to the studio and make these new rhymes.’

"They gave you the multi-track, and you did what you could. What they’re doing now is not really remixing. If they’re not changing the music, that’s just re-vocaling and throwing [guest verses on the song].

“Chubb Rock was dope. We were friends since before he made records. Most of the rappers who came out of Brooklyn or who came out period, they would go to clubs and get to know people. So I practically knew every rapper before they made their records because they wanted to be familiar with the DJs and what was happening in hip-hop.

“I was happening in hip-hop. I was one of the more premiere club DJs. If you went in to a hip-hop club, I was one of the ones who was playing most of the time. Me, Red Alert, Chuck Chillout, we were playing the clubs. So you had to get to know us.

 

[In terms of him talking shit about New Kids On The Block], I think every rapper had an anti-establishment view. When you’re doing this rap thing and all of a sudden these five white kids are moving rap music out of the way, rappers are going to feel a certain way.

 

"We had to want to play your record. Then, I was on the radio, so you really wanted me to know you and to play your record. Plus, in Brooklyn, I was the one. So I knew every artist that was coming out of Brooklyn anyway.

“[In terms of him talking shit about New Kids On The Block on the song], I think every rapper had an anti-establishment view, and I don’t think it was particularly just him. When you’re doing this rap thing and it’s blowing up, and all of a sudden these five white kids are making these records and they’re moving rap music out of the way, rappers are going to feel a certain way.

"What rappers aren’t remembering is that they moved everything out of the way for them when they dropped. Things happen in cycles. The good part is that rap actually stayed. But Chubb was a very conscious rapper with serious skills. It wasn’t like he was preaching. He was saying really good stuff, really well. He was very, very good.”

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