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The 25 Whitest TV Shows of All Time

1. Seinfeld

Network: NBC
Air Dates: July 5, 1989-May 14, 1998
Stars: Jerry Seinfeld, Jason Alexander, Michael Richards, Julia Louis-Dreyfus

It was a show about nothing—nothing but white people. Though it's easily one of the best sitcoms ever, Seinfeld is also the whitest show ever. Created by Jerry Seinfeld and Larry David, the show focused on the random occurrences in Seinfeld's life. The bulk of his interactions were with his friend George, his one-time girlfriend Elaine, and Kramer, the weird guy with the crazy hair that lived across the hall from him. Seinfeld was a rare bird; it didn't focus on co-workers or a family, but was totally driven by characters. It's impossible to imagine a show that could succeed without its characters evolving or changing, but Seinfeld charmed its way to the top of the Nielsen ratings and into the hearts of critics without the main characters ever learning anything. They stayed locked inside their world (a metaphor for whiteness?). Their mistakes were hilarious and made for amazing television—watching strange white folks do anything is amazingly rewarding.

Seinfeld became a pop culture phenomenon, all the way down to its music. The show inspired Wale to create the critically acclaimed Mixtape About Nothing, thrusting him into the spotlight. He followed it up with More About Nothing in 2010, and earlier this year, Seinfeld himself revealed that he and Wale would be collaborating on The Album About Nothing.

Prior to Wale, the last time you heard black folks mentioned in the same breath as Seinfeld was after Michael Richards' 2006 N-bombing. Even though Richards made fun of himself and the incident on David's Curb Your Enthusiasm, people still haven't forgotten. That didn't tarnish the reputation of Seinfeld, which, for all of its Caucasian nihilism, is one of the most important shows ever made.

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