DJ Muggs Tells All: The Stories Behind His Classic Records (Part 1)

Cypress Hill "Stoned Is the Way of the Walk" (1991)

Album: Latin Lingo
Label: Ruffhouse Records
DJ Muggs: “We had finished the album already, and mixed the album. So we went back to L.A., and Joe ‘The Butcher,’ who owned Ruffhouse Records with Chris Schwartz and he mixed the first album, he was like, ‘We need a couple more songs for the record.’ So I’m like, ‘Alright, I got these two beats.’

“So we’re sitting in the car in front of Sen Dog’s house on Cypress Avenue, and I played the ‘Stoned Is The Way of the Walk’ and ‘Hole in the Head’ beats. And B-Real was kicking his rhymes, and Joe thought ‘Stoned Is The Way of the Walk’ rhymes should go on ‘Hole in the Head.’ And I was like, ‘Nah, nah, nah, it should go this way.’

“So we went in the studio, and we did both songs in one day. And ‘Stoned Is The Way of the Walk’ was pretty much the style from ‘Hole in the Head.’ That’s where it originated from. But it would have been interesting if we did the songs on the other beats. I don’t think they would have been what they are. But the fact that they worked out like this ended up better for us.

 

[A Tribe Called Quest’s ‘Vibes and Stuff’ and ‘Stoned Is The Way of the Walk’] came out at the same time. I didn’t know. At that time, I almost pulled ‘Kill a Man’ off the album because EPMD used [the same sample] with LL Cool J [on ‘Rampage’]. And the thing at that time as a producer was you never wanted to use anyone else’s sample. Don’t look like nobody, don’t sound like them.

 

“A lot of times when we do records, we record the album, and then after we mix the album, we end up doing a few more records right at that time. And it always seems like we come up with the best shit when we’re not thinking or trying. The album’s done, and it’s just like, boom. In the studio in Philly, we squeezed in ‘Latin Lingo.’ Then when we got back to L.A., we did those two.

“That was funny, because [A Tribe Called Quest’s ‘Vibes and Stuff’ and ‘Stoned Is The Way of the Walk’] came out at the same time. I didn’t know. At that time, I almost pulled ‘Kill a Man’ off the album because EPMD used [the same sample] with LL Cool J [on ‘Rampage’]. And the thing at that time as a producer was you never wanted to use anyone else’s sample. Don’t look like nobody, don’t sound like them. Don’t use their slang, don’t dress like them. Don’t flip their shit. But if they weren’t like, ‘Nah, it’s dope, it’s dope,’ I might’ve pulled it. I was serious about not using any samples anyone else used. I’m glad I didn’t. [Laughs.]

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