Who Is Autre Ne Veut?

The Making of Anxiety

Autre Ne Veut: "We were all in a room. [I worked with] my friend Dan Lopatin, who does Oneohtrix Point Never, and my friend Joel, who works with Dan on this project Ford & Lopatin. The sound came about from us playing the tracks live together in a live room, but we also dumped out the midi and then kind of went from there. Then took that live sound and changed the sounds and changed the vibe. I definitely had help on the production side, but I was executive producer.

 

There was a painstaking process of pulling out 75% of things. So the idea was to not say no to any ideas early on in the production, but then make really stark decisions. What is privileged right now? What is the thing that needs to be there at this moment?

 

"Somebody would play from the beginning of the track to the end whatever it is that they’re playing. Then there was a painstaking process of pulling out 75% of things. So the idea was to not say no to any ideas early on in the production, but then make really stark decisions. What is privileged right now? What is the thing that needs to be there at this moment? There are exceptions, but for the most part, we were trying to have this one privileged thing happening at any given time. There was a lot of not saying no to anything and then cutting out most of it.

"With my earlier recordings there is tons of vocal layers, both actually performed but also massive octave pitches. I was listening to a lot of Silent Shout, that Knife record and trying to borrow ideas some ideas from that.

“I wanted the vocals to be more raw and exposed so I didn’t overly process most of them, but then there are these moments where there’s obvious pitching effects. I wanted each of the vocal effects to stand out for themselves and have more of a punch. Take a Dr. Luke/Ke$ha vocal treatment idea but put it in a weird place and have it do something too blatant. Instead of being comfortable and fitting in in a normal pop way, it would just stand out in an awkward way.

 

When I wrote that song, I was brushing my teeth in the bathroom and then had a weird little moment where the time period in my head between the present moment and my death kind of collapsed to no time at all.

 

"All the lyrics are stream of consciousness, so there’s not much thought put into them. [Laughs.] I just think about something, focus on it, and just go for it and see what happens. I guess I don’t swear that well inherently. Nothing gets written down.

"‘Gonna Die’ is pretty self-explanatory, kind of an existential crisis moment. When I wrote that song, I was brushing my teeth in the bathroom and then had a weird little moment where the time period in my head between the present moment and my death kind of collapsed to no time at all. I had a strong awareness of that and was kind of freaking out thinking I need to do something to distract myself, so I went in and knocked that song out.

“‘Warning’ is a song about trying to relate to somebody where all the clear warnings are there that there’s a problem and shit’s dangerous for whatever reason, but still going ahead anyway. ‘Promises’ is a song written in the midst of a relationship about the final breakup. It’s a statement of finality or a failed statement of finality and relationships being complicated. I don’t know, they’re all little neurotic, overly perseverating on one idea."

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