DJ Muggs Tells All: The Stories Behind His Classic Records (Part 1)

Cypress Hill f/ Erick Sermon, Redman, and MC Eiht “Throw Your Hands in the Air” (1995)

Album:"Throw Your Hands in the Air" 12 Inch
Label: Columbia, Ruffhouse Records

DJ Muggs: “We put the album out, and it was running its course, and then, we wanted to give the album a little boost. So you give it another three months of life. So at that time, that was that. And it came out so gangster.

“I had always been an Erick Sermon and Redman fan, so I had reached out to them, like, ‘What do I have to do to get you guys on a record? How much is it gonna cost?’ And they were like, ‘Nothing. We’re fans. We want to do it.’ Fuckin’ A. Then I wanted to get somebody from the West. So I got MC Eiht.

 

I had always been an Erick Sermon and Redman fan, so I had reached out to them, like, ‘What do I have to do to get you guys on a record? How much is it gonna cost?’ And they were like, ‘Nothing. We’re fans. We want to do it.’

 

“Fuckin’ MC Eiht wrote his verse in fifteen minutes and laid it in one take. I was like, ‘Wow.’ It blew me away, man. I wasn’t used to seeing people write their shit that quick. And [he was so animated]. We went and shot the video in L.A.. My boy McG, who ended up doing the big show The O.C. and Charlie’s Angels. So we did some of the first videos he shot. Fuck you McG for never calling me for a song on your soundtracks. [Laughs.] I did your first three videos. But the video was great. The concepts and the ideas he had, like putting MC Eiht in front of all the hubcaps, and the way he shot from the side.

“Redman was the funkiest, sickest motherfucker. Cypress Hill had a lot of influence on Redman early on. It’s funny, because he had a big influence on us, but we had a big influence back on him. It was like an exchange of energy. We used some of their samples, and they used some of ours, and nobody ever sued. There was more respect at that time for things, and people using samples.

“Even when I had used the samples on the first album from Wild Style, Fab 5 Freddy was like, ‘That’s hip-hop, I’m glad you used that.’ Mark the 45 King [said the same thing]. You see fools now, they’re trying to sue you off a fucking mixtape like, ‘Oh, you’re making money off your shows, and selling t-shirts.’ It’s like, ‘Wow, it’s getting that bad? Shut up, it’s a fucking mixtape.’”

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