As Executive Vice President of Def Jam Records Terius “The-Dream” Nash, sits proudly in a plush office on the eighth floor of Universal Music Group’s NYC headquarters. Being one of the heads at the house that rap built is just one of the hats he wears, though.

He’s also a multi-multiplatinum writer and producer who’s crafted hits for Rihanna, Beyoncé, and Justin Bieber—to name a few. Yesterday Complex met with Dream—not so much to talk about his work for others, but to get into what he has on deck as a solo artist.

Since dropping his debut Love Hate in 2007, The-Dream’s earned a reputation as a lady-loving, self-deprecating singer and songwriter who’s unafraid of telling us all about the joys of his highly publicized relationships—as well as the foul feelings he had as they crashed. His upcoming fourth album, The Love, IV promises to strike those same chords.

Repping his hometown with an Atlanta Falcons snapback, several gold necklaces, and Jordan 11 Concords, The-Dream slouched on a cream leather couch and talked about IV, producing cuts on Pusha T’s forthcoming debut album, his thoughts on Frank Ocean and The Weeknd, and what to expect from his Kill the Lights tour.

Interview by Brad Wete (@BradWete)

You have your own sound—as soon as one of your records drops, folks know it’s yours. Does it piss you off when others imitate that sound? Do you look at it like “I have reinvent and switch it up a bit?” Or do you feel like, “I’m not going to change myself”?

Good loaded first question. It’s flattering on one hand, I think, if any artists are using a format that we made popular—the repetition, the pronunciation of certain things, yeah. And then on one hand it’s not that it’s disrespectful from a media standpoint, it’s just sad what they do with the credit of it. The first thing you would mention, probably just as a music lover would be knowing what the source is. In this culture now, especially where media is not really media, it’s more blogging. It’s easy to forget what somebody probably invented just days before.

It’s crazy, because getting that information is as easy as a Google search.

Yeah. I met this girl maybe a week ago and she knew all about this one guy and she had never heard my stuff. She was like “Awww man, this is crazy!” The producer in the room was like “Hold up hold up. Let me play you something.”

So he played her these records. He played “Fancy” first. She was like “Who the hell is this?” He was like “That’s him,” pointing at me. She was like “Oh, well the only thing I knew was “Shawty is a 10.”

Well, number one, you’re late by like five years. Number two, how are you supposed to love a guy that sounds like this guy and then not know where it comes from? [Laughs.] Now that’s just disrespectful.

Some people hear a lot of The-Dream in The Weeknd. The Weeknd is kinda like you on drugs—literally. I wanted to know your take on The Weeknd specifically.

 

I think The Weeknd is an incredible melodically driven artist. People often say to me that he sounds a lot like what I do, and I’m sure that the influence is there. But he’s not me, nor is he trying to be me.

 

I think he’s an incredible melodically driven artist. People often say to me that he sounds a lot like what I do, and I’m sure that the influence is there. But he’s not me, nor is he trying to be me. He has his own culture of those guys that like that music. He’s an artist first. I’m a songwriter first.

My gears that I have to go through... One minute in my mind to be Beyoncé and one minute to be Rihanna and one second to do a hook for Kanye and then have to write records for myself. I’m so many people, I’m never just one person. So I don’t have to reinvent because artists around me reinvent for me.

The records that I’m going to do two years from now for myself are going to be dictated by what Rihanna does in two years or what somebody we’ve never heard of does. So that’s the difference between me and anybody else that’s in that place—because there hasn’t been a cultural writer that’s an artist also, really, since R. Kelly.

True.

Because you can take my sound and put it on anybody. His sound is his sound. You would know. There are records of mine that you wouldn’t even know that I’d written. You’d never even guess.

When I mentioned that you did “Baby” for Justin Bieber, everyone in the office was like, “Huh?”

Perfect example. That’s what I mean. I reinvent through other people.

In a way what you have is amazing thing. But in another sense, you don’t really have a specific thing to hang your hat on, unlike the acts you write for.

Well hopefully it works out how it did for Jay and I end up being this 40-year-old guy who gets his first No. 1 at that age. I’d rather it work out that way because I’m not letting go of culture just to become defined as a person that does that. Because once we know you do that, that’s all we want you to do. We don’t want you to do anything else and I’m in that box enough as just an artist period.

What do you think of Frank Ocean? Would you say he’s a writer or an artist first?

 

I definitely don’t hear any of my stuff in what Frank Ocean does. I think he and The Weeknd have this niche, which is what artists need to find out and go directly to the people they’re talking to.

 

I would say an artist first. Whenever you’re signed as an artist, you’re pretty much an artist first. I think he signed to Tricky [Stewart], actually. I definitely don’t hear any of my stuff in what he does. I can’t personally hear it. He has a great cult following also.

I think he and The Weeknd have this niche, which is what artists need to find out and go directly to the people they’re talking to. Only those guys know who they’re talking to. That’s what you need at the end of the day.

Where is your place in the game as an artist? Do you look at the Billboard Charts on a competitive level, like, “I’m trying to bust into the Top 10 of R&B or The Hot 100.” Where do you feel your spot is?

Mine is the arrogant spot of being able to drop music that moves the needle and not give a fuck about where it ends up on the chart. I have that luxury to not even care about what number. None of those guys you’ve mentioned before, nobody else who’s definitely just an artist first can have that. So, naturally, they can’t really be as raw as they want to be.

Even if they try their best they can’t do it. If you do it on record one, you can’t do it on record two because you still look for the numbers and you have to go by the numbers. It’s like when Jay says, “Men lie, women lie, numbers don’t.” That’s exactly right. Except I have the luxury of a songwriter who lives through the numbers of so many other people that the number doesn’t matter to me on an album of mine.

Only thing that matters is the number of people that matter that I move. It only matters if Jay is like “Oh, this shit’s crazy” or if Kanye is like “Man, that track on number 11!” That matters to me.

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