Diamond D Tells All: The Stories Behind His Classic Records

A Tribe Called Quest f/ Sadat X, Lord Jamar, and Diamond D "Show Business" (1991)

Producer: A Tribe Called Quest

Album: The Low End Theory

Label: Jive

Diamond D: “Skef Anslem [who also worked with A Tribe Called Quest] was an engineer at Jazzy Jay’s studio on Allerton Avenue in the Bronx. That was home base. Jazzy Jay’s the one who put me on. I call Jay the teacher. I would just go up there and be up under him. He had all the breakbeats and original shit, and I was a beat head. So just to watch him put together beats here and there, it made me want to get my money up and get a sampler.

“So I met Tip at first up there. We sat and talked about beats, and just connected. I told him I liked his music, and he said he was feeling my shit. We were both in Zulu Nation too, so it was that whole umbrella.”

 
This was around that time where Grand Puba and Lord Jamar started having their [friction], and I think Puba didn’t show up for the session. Tip said, ‘Yo D, if you got something, you can jump on here.’
 

“Somehow I wound up at Battery Studios that day. I didn’t come down there to work on the song, I just came through to hear them working on the new album. This was around that time where Grand Puba and Lord Jamar started having their [friction], and I think Puba didn’t show up for the session. Tip said, ‘Yo D, if you got something, you can jump on here.’ And I wrote it right there on the spot, and I kept my verse within the concept that Tip had on the hook.

“Shout out to Stu Fine [from Wild Pitch Records]. I had a little gripe with Stu, but looking back on it, I should have been on top of my paperwork. Now that I’m older and wiser, I see that. But I definitely threw a rock at him [when I said, ‘You don’t want to make a pitch that’s wild’ at the end of my verse].

“It was definitely a good look. I already had my deal [before The Low End Theory came out]. But being on that album helped people know who I was.”

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