UPDATE 12:20 p.m.: At a press conference early Friday afternoon, Andrew Neiman of the LAPD confirmed the discovery of the knife and told reporters that an investigation is ongoing. As for the possibility of O.J. Simpson once again becoming involved with the murder case, Neiman said double jeopardy would prevent that from taking place. "As with all cases that remain open, unless there's an actual arrest or conviction, the cases remain open," Neiman told reporters, according to KTLA.

No additional details were provided.

See original story below.

A mysterious knife is now reportedly under investigation by the Los Angeles Police Department after being uncovered on the former property of American Crime Story subject O.J. Simpson. The "folding buck knife" was reportedly discovered by a construction worker "years ago," TMZ reports, but wasn’t turned over to authorities until January of this year for some pretty bizarre reasons.

After the construction worker uncovered the knife, possibly during the Simpson estate’s demolition process in 1998, he approached a nearby police officer and forfeited the weapon. That officer, who was actually working security for a film shoot just across the street on Rockingham, never turned over the knife and instead stashed it at his own residence for several years.

Once the officer retired from the LAPD, he allegedly contacted his friend in the department’s Robbery Homicide Division to reportedly get the departmental record number for the Nicole Brown Simpson and Ronald Goldman murder case. His alleged reasoning for obtaining this number? According to TMZ, the officer wanted to frame the knife and display it in his home.

This friend, taken aback by the officer’s request, then alerted the department before demanding the knife be turned over for further investigation. The knife, currently being tested for potential fingerprints, will soon be tested for various biological evidence. Though the age of the knife obscures accuracy to the naked eye, one source tells TMZ the knife appeared to "have blood residue on it," though this detail has thus far not been confirmed by the department’s investigation. Simpson, of course, was ultimately found not guilty of the murders in 1995.