"The illest part about the whole thing was: My birthday is on February 11th. We dropped it a few days before because of the demand and then the whole world got it on the 11th, on my birthday, as planned. That was the best gift I could have ever gotten. We were so busy that we didn't even have time to celebrate. 50 had so much stuff to do I couldn't even celebrate my birthday. I couldn't even chill.

I knew I had a classic in my hands. I had higher predictions on that album than 50 had for himself. No one could tell me that 50 wasn't going to be the biggest rapper of this time, period. I bet everything on him. I bet my safety, I bet my life, I bet my family. We recorded in my house when people wanted to kill his ass.

"If you notice, that album is demographically covered. He covered the South—I had found Buck from hanging out with Juvenile, so that was Buck's debut as well. That was our G-Unit South extension, we were grabbing someone from the South. Working with Dre, that was West Coast. With Eminem, that's the Mid-West. So regionally we were covered.

"He did his thing for the weed heads too. 50 doesn't even smoke weed, but I was the one getting high all the time in front of him. He made that record not only an album, but he marketed the songs, personally. If you break it down it's like, this is for the weed heads, this is for the heads in the South. That's how he thought.

 

[50] was still a cheap bastard, and he didn't even want to have to hire an engineer. So I had to engineer the record too, at an all-in fee. But it was a get-rich fee. That fee made me a millionaire at 26.

 


"I engineered the album. I recorded all the vocals on that album except for what Dr. Dre did. I recorded it at my crib in my basement, so I was the engineer. If I wasn't the engineer, I was the producer. If I wasn't the producer, I was the co-producer. If I wasn't the co-producer, I was the executive producer. I was the one finding him the music to rap to.

"Damn near everything [was recorded at my crib] in Westbury, New York. Even 'In Da Club and 'Many Men' were recorded at my crib. I learned Pro Tools doing that album. 'What Up Gangsta' was recorded at my crib but I lost the vocals, so we had to re-cut those vocals. That was all recorded in my basement, that's where we did all the G-Unit shit. Every last one of them.

"After that album dropped, that was the last year he worked in my basement. After that, we hit the road for two years straight, and we seen New York for about 20 days for the whole year. We hit the road and we never returned back to that. I never moved back to that house. I moved totally up from that point on.

"I never wanted to be an engineer but we didn't have any money to pay anybody. Even when we got the check, he was still a cheap bastard, and he didn't even want to have to hire an engineer. So I had to engineer the record too, at an all-in fee. But it was a get rich fee. That fee made me a millionaire at 26. So I thank 50 Cent for that, because I got rich and I didn't die trying."