Label: Tuff Gong

This bouncy cut off the Exodus album, also featured on the greatest hits compilation Legend, became one of Marley's best known songs, a celebration of good times and great music. But it took on a whole new meaning when Bob Marley returned to Jamaica from self-imposed exile in London (where he'd been cooling out since a 1976 assassination attempt) and performed the song at the One Love Peace Concert on April 22, 1978.

 

Bob's hypnotic live performance of 'Jammin,' which is featured in the film Marley and included on the film's official soundtrack, turned a party song into a mystical ritual to cast out the curse of political violence.

 

Bob's hypnotic live performance of "Jammin," which is featured in the film Marley and included on the film's official soundtrack, turned a party song into a mystical ritual to cast out the curse of political violence. Jamaica was then on the front lines of the Cold War, with a pro-Cuba socialist government led by Prime Minister Michael Manley clashing against a fiercely anti-Communist right-wing opposition led by Edward Seaga.

Only Bob Marley could have convinced Manley and Seaga to jam with him onstage and join their hands together in a sign of unity under the banner of Jah Rastafari. Although the bloodshed would eventually continue, for that one miraculous moment at least it seemed that reggae music had the power to change the world.