Playboy, in an apparent reversal of that 2015 no-nudes announcement, has decided to fully embrace its inherent Playboy-ness. The long-running publication's new Chief Creative Officer, Cooper Hefner, admitted Monday the decision to remove nudity—a decision made under Chief Executive Scott Flanders—was a mistake.

"Nudity was never the problem because nudity isn't a problem," Cooper, the son of Playboy founder Hugh Hefner, said on Twitter to a round of digital applause. "Today we're taking our identity back and reclaiming who we are." In the first entry of the rebooted Playboy Philosophy column, Cooper outlined his bold plan for Playboy's future.

"At this point in history, the most vital intellectual discussion we can have is how to create a society that's as free as possible without ignoring the social and economic implications of our policy decisions," he wrote. "We need to identify who our allies are at a time when, on the liberal side, a culture of political correctness discourages debate that may hurt people's feelings and, on the conservative side, politicians seem comfortable jeopardizing the rights of specific groups in the belief that it will 'make America great again.'"

For additional clarity on where exactly Cooper stands regarding the current White House fuckery, just peep this tweet:

Back in December 2015, Pamela Anderson covered what everyone initially thought would be the final nude issue of Playboy. During an accompanying interview with James Franco, Anderson recalled her classic 1989 cover debut. "The photographer shot me in one roll of film because I was nervous and throwing up," Anderson said. "But then I saw the pictures, and from there it was hard to keep my clothes on! I was painfully shy before, but then it clicked in my head that nobody cares what you look like naked except you."

The March/April issue features profiles on Van Jones and Run the Jewels, in addition to an Elizabeth Elam cover shot by Gavin Bond.

Playboy did not immediately respond to Complex's request for comment.