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News of retirement by San Francisco 49ers 24-year-old linebacker Chris Borland has rocked the NFL this morning. Borland announced yesterday that he would retire immediately, citing repeated head-trauma. The discussion over the impact Borland's decision may or may not have has bubbled over, roping in anyone who cares about football. While the conversation has mainly focused on the game's safety and long-term future (think of the children!), Maurice Clarett has chimed in with the perspective of a collegiate athlete. 

On Twitter this morning, Clarett posted a lengthy stream-of-consciousness on how universities and the media are valuing the wrong things to begin with. Playing football is what's brought Borland and Clarett to our attention, but Clarett's got a serious problem with how big-time collegiate football players are handled by schools. He focused on Borland's education off-the-field, and how many players don't seem to realize that there's a future beyond football—the NFL isn't for everyone, and only a select few (relative to the thousands who try) can make a real living from it.   

In regard to Chris Borland.They should do a study on his upbringing and education. See how he defines success. He probably has a backup plan

— Maurice Clarett (@ReeseClarett13) March 17, 2015

Lots of guys don't have a backup plan. They get shuffled thru the college ranks and only see football as an option to succeed.

— Maurice Clarett (@ReeseClarett13) March 17, 2015

They often tolerate the trauma for the paycheck.... No one is right or wrong. It all comes down to quality of life for each individual.

— Maurice Clarett (@ReeseClarett13) March 17, 2015

Clarett argues that, even if college athletes do earn a degree, they're essentially set-up for failure after their playing days are over, because their education is mostly hot air. For the next 50-plus years of their lives, they're playing catch-up with people who have relevant skills for jobs in every day professions, not athletics.

Kids earn schools millions. Let's forget about paying to play... Conversation should be actually educating them so they can be of some value

— Maurice Clarett (@ReeseClarett13) March 17, 2015

Lots of these universities push classes on players that they would never allow their own children to take.

— Maurice Clarett (@ReeseClarett13) March 17, 2015

Kid misses practice and he's Criticized and punished to no end.... Kid signs up for "nonsense" classes and no one says a word.

— Maurice Clarett (@ReeseClarett13) March 17, 2015

For college players having a "degree" is not enough. It's VERY easy for a school to graduate players with "nonsense" degrees.

— Maurice Clarett (@ReeseClarett13) March 17, 2015

Practice, Weightlifting and sprints are valid until about 30 if you're lucky. Education helps to assist family, community, friends etc etc

— Maurice Clarett (@ReeseClarett13) March 17, 2015

Not stopping there, Clarett shifted the blame to the heads of universities and coaches for acting in an irresponsible, possibly fraudulent manner at the cost of donors and student-athletes alike. A donor's only sacrificing some petty cash though—kid's livelihoods are on the line here. 

Let me help ppl out. Universities pad stats with "graduation rates" in order to solicit donors for more donations.

— Maurice Clarett (@ReeseClarett13) March 17, 2015

Donors feel good about the"graduation rates" and shell out more money. Donors have no clue that the degrees hold no value in today's economy

— Maurice Clarett (@ReeseClarett13) March 17, 2015

I hope that the coaches see it and I hope they encourage other coaches to force kids to take real classes.

— Maurice Clarett (@ReeseClarett13) March 17, 2015

And all of this—the misrepresentation, the lying, the bullshit, the head trauma—it's all done in the name of the great sport of football, and the billions of dollars it earns people. Bless this sport. 

Send all complaints, compliments, and tips to sportstips@complex.com.

[via Twitter]