• The episode title “Martial Feats of Comanche Horsemanship” refers to an 1834 painting by George Catlin that’s seen in Judd’s home. It’s all about the craft a young rider displays in avoiding an attack by an opposing force by sliding down the side of his horse, effectively outmaneuvering a fatal blow. 
  • The flying news reporters looked to be using a version of Mothman’s wings. One of the original Minutemen, Mothman was: “A playboy adventurer who donned a splendidy bizarre Moth Suit to fight crime, lending him the ability to glide for short distance,” per Moore and Gibbons.
  • Not surprising that Veidt has moved on to creating and growing human clones after genetically engineering a cat in the comic book.
  • Veidt’s use of “The Ride of the Valkyries” in the play has a two-fold significance: It’s a reference in the first issue of the comic. From the “Under the Hood,” Hollis Mason states that “[it’s] the saddest thing I can think of . . . every time I heard I get depressed and start wondering about the lot of humanity and the unfairness of life and all those other things you think about a three in the morning when your digestion won’t let you sleep.” Secondly, it scores Doctor Manhattan’s and the Comedian’s invasion of Vietnam in Snyder’s film adaptation.  
  • Character actor James Wolk (aka Mad Men’s Bob Benson) shows up this week as Senator Joe Keene. That surname will especially resonate for comic readers as the Keene Act was established by Joe’s father, John David Keene, to outlaw any “costumed adventuring” of any kind. Someone to keep an eye on for sure.
  • Angela’s investigation in the house also recalls Rorschach’s process of discovering Eddie Blake’s Comedian costume after his death. I also like the continued use of Nite Owl-like tech as police-based tools.
  • Speaking of Rorschach, it looks like Tim Blake Nelson’s Looking Glass might be the closest analog to that character, as he rarely removes his mask, is a man of few words, and rather enjoys eating.
  • I’ve referenced additional and supplemental materials a few times throughout this, which is one of the things that the comic does really nicely to flesh out the world. Lindelof and crew feel the same way, as a series of extra context was posted this week via the show’s new companion site. I’ll let you dig into them yourself if you’re curious, but there are few interesting bits worth mentioning: Rorschach’s letter at the end of the comic was largely ignored by the public, as it was published in the (essentially) alt-right publication The New Frontiersman; Laurie Juspecyck would join the FBI, eventually forgoing not only the Silk Specter moniker but her last name too, instead taking up the name Laurie Blake and the title “The Comedienne” in honor of her later father; and after the events of the comic, Dan Dreiberg (Nite Owl) is in federal custody, where he refuses to speak about the events that transpired in Antarctica. Something to keep an eye on moving forward.
  • Also, if you’re jonesing for a fix of that sweet, sweet Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross score, the duo released their end credits theme online for you to listen to while we wait for an official release.