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This year, it looks like the women of Game of Thrones are taking control after much criticism that the show was anti-feminist, particularly with Sansa’s storyline in season 5. While showrunners David Benioff and Dan Weiss deny reports that they tweaked storylines for the upcoming season after fan outcry, it’s obvious that female characters like Arya Stark will be headed in a different direction come April 24.

Maisie Williams, who began portraying the youngest Stark daughter in her early teens, was labeled a feminist before she even knew what that meant. But after someone finally explained it to her, the now 18-year-old developed her own theory on the word.

"I remember thinking, 'Isn’t that just like everyone?' And then I realized everyone is not a feminist, unfortunately," she told Entertainment Weekly. "But I also feel like we should stop calling feminists 'feminists' and just start calling people who aren’t feminist 'sexist'and then everyone else is just a human. You are either a normal person or a sexist."

It’s a unique approach, one that might get the people of Twitter fired up. Appearing particularly cautious when sharing her opinions, it’s safe to say Williams probably experienced the wrath of GOT’s very vocal fans at some point.

"Once people are angry about something, you start worrying about saying the right thing instead of just saying what you mean. It’s very easy to have an opinion. Everyone’s got one. But it’s very difficult to speak up about difficult subjects when people are angry with you. People say: 'Why don’t you speak up!' [and I’m thinking], 'Because you all got pitchforks and you’re ready to kill us!' It’s scary if you say something wrong."

Many a celeb has had to learn that lesson the hard way, including Chloë Grace Moretz and Khloé Kardashian