When nine bikers were shot dead during a bloody confrontation between two rival biker gangs at Twin Peaks in Waco, Texas earlier this year, local authorities were quickly overwhelmed with so many seized weapons that a truck was requested to haul them away from the scene. Police ultimately recovered 480 different weapons, including 151 guns and "assorted knives, brass knuckles, batons, hammers, and the bikers’ blunt objects of choice." 177 bikers were promptly arrested and charged with participating in organized crime activity, though some are now disputing those charges.

Though no one has been charged in the death of the nine bikers in the five months since the startling outburst of violence, CNN has managed to obtain surveillance footage and a slew of photos documenting what they call "one of the bloodiest afternoons in the history of American motorcycle clubs." As for what actually caused the seemingly sudden shootout to erupt, both sides are telling predictably contradictory stories. 

The Bandidos, who originally formed in Houston in 1966, claim they reserved the patio at Twin Peaks so they could discuss various matters of "club business" before being ambushed by the Cossacks. The Cossacks argue that they were actually invited to the Bandidos’ meeting as a way of establishing peace between the two units, though some members are now theorizing they were "set up." While a grand jury weighs potential charges stemming from the nine deaths, both police and prosecutors have been silenced by an apparent gag order.