The actor and writer of many talents stakes a claim to his comedic set.

By Justin Monroe; Photography by Chris McPherson; (HAIR) GINA BONAQUISTI; (MAKEUP) SHAUNA GIESBRECHT; (PHOTOS) HOMELESS MAN: ISTOCK
He’s never been featured in a Kings of Comedy movie, but Thomas Lennon wears a crown. If ye doubt, simply watch as the 38-year-old actor and writer rules over improv stages, movie theaters and the boob tube this spring. Best known as closeted, short-shorts-clad Lieutenant Jim Dangle on Reno 911! Lennon can be seen playing Paul Rudd’s man-date in I Love You, Man; Zac Efron’s dorky BFF in 17 Again; and Wilbur, one half of the Wright Brothers, in Night at the Museum 2: Battle of the Smithsonian (which he co-wrote with his regular writing partner, Ben Garant). In between his myriad projects, he sat with Complex to discuss testicle insurance and glory holes (in that order).
Are you ever concerned that your 911 calls might go unanswered because Reno parodies cops?
Thomas Lennon:
But the cops recognized you?
Thomas Lennon:
How ironic. Dangle’s bike always gets stolen on Reno.
Thomas Lennon:
Are you considered a gay icon for your work as Lt. Dangle?
Thomas Lennon:Out
Dangle’s become a pretty popular Halloween costume. Is there any concern about what those imposters are out there doing?
Thomas Lennon:
Seeing as the uniform consists of tight short-shorts, have you insured your testicles?
Thomas Lennon:
Thomas Lennon
Speaking of workplace hazards, you’ve got a make-out scene with Paul Rudd in I Love You, Man. Word on the street is he was botching takes so he could keep kissing you.
Thomas Lennon:
So, if you woke up as a teenage Zac Efron, like Matthew Perry in 17 Again, what are the first three things you’d do?
Thomas Lennon:
“Zac and Mirren Make a Porno!”—I smell a sequel. Anyway, you channeled Wilbur Wright for Night at the Museum 2. If you could have a conversation with one historical figure, who would it be?
Thomas Lennon:
FX has the rights to Formosa, a series you and Ben Garant conceived about the early days of the porn industry. Are you sitting on a pile of old stag films for “research”?
Thomas Lennon:
When was that?
Thomas Lennon:
There’s a huge difference—scholars say the Great Depression set back glory-hole design 20 years. People need to consider the history of the glory hole.
Thomas Lennon:
True, but humans have gotten bigger over the years…
Thomas Lennon: