Meat Loaf, whose legacy spans long-revered works across music and film, is dead.

The Bat Out of Hell trilogy crafter—born Marvin Lee Aday—was confirmed to have died late Thursday night in a statement shared to Facebook. He was 74.

“We know how much he meant to so many of you and we truly appreciate all of the love and support as we move through this time of grief in losing such an inspiring artist and beautiful man,” the statement said. “We thank you for your understanding of our need for privacy at this time. From his heart to your souls…don’t ever stop rocking!”

The aforementioned Bat Out of Hell trilogy has long stood as a model for how to rapturously present a theatrical take on rock music, with the first entry in the trilogy (and Meat Loaf’s debut album) still ranked among the best-selling albums of all time.

The 1977 album’s sequel, the 1993-released Bat Out of Hell II: Back Into Hell, featured the Grammy-winning hit “I’d Do Anything for Love (But I Won’t Do That).” Other routinely revisited highlights from the expansive Meat Loaf catalog include “Two Out of Three Ain’t Bad,” “I’m Gonna Love Her for Both of Us,” the Cher-featuring “Dead Ringer for Love,” “Rock and Roll Dreams Come Through,” “Objects in the Rear View Mirror May Appear Closer Than They Are,” and more.

As an actor, Meat Loaf is most known for his unforgettable turn as the motorcycle-riding Eddie in the 1975 classic Rocky Horror Picture Show. He also made memorable appearances in Wayne’s World, Spice World, Fight Club, and the 1998 trucker-focused action film Black Dog alongside Randy Travis and the late Patrick Swayze.

Last April, Jim Steinman—Meat Loaf’s friend and frequent collaborator—died at 73 due to kidney failure. During a Songwriters Hall of Fame induction speech back in 2012, Meat Loaf called Steinman “the biggest influence” on his life.

Meat Loaf died on Thursday while surrounded by wife Deborah and daughters Pearl and Amanda, as well as a number of close friends.

RIP.