For all the acts combining the sounds of emo with rap music, Vermont's nothing,nowhere. is one of the few artists to lean more heavily in the direction of post-hardcore than his contemporaries. Having supported bands like Thrice and La Dispute on numerous tours, he's the type of crossover success seldom seen, bridging two subcultures in a very genuine way. "For a large portion of my life emo music was all I listened to," he explains over email. "That type of music was the soundtrack to my childhood mostly. I just appreciated the rawness and vulnerability that was portrayed in the songs."

While he doesn't think the music he makes is emo in particular, he does see why he's often labeled as such. "I think it's just important to experiment in general. I feel like artists tend to hear a sound and then they want to emulate it instead of expand on it and create something new entirely. I think like any genre of music, emo will continue to expand. We saw a similar thing with old heads in hip-hop hating on the new wave of rap... it's crazy to see sort of a similar thing happening in emo I guess."

emo was the soundtrack to my childhood mostly. I just appreciated the rawness and vulnerability that was portrayed in the songs."

His 2017 album Reaper featured both Chris Carrabba of Dashboard Confessional and Delaware rapper Lil West, and the ease with which both artists integrate into nothing,nowhere.'s world speaks volumes about his approach. On top of skittering hi-hats, nothing,nowhere. raps and sings openly about his struggles, effortlessly blending the world of both underground rap and second-wave emo.

Overall, nothing,nowhere. remains unconcerned by gatekeepers or genre tags. "I hate sounding like a pessimist, but honestly who cares, you know? We all die and we will be dead for an infinite amount of years. So fretting over something as insignificant as a musical genre seems like a colossal waste of time. Make what you want to make, music is music and it is beautiful."