Prolific songwriter Jack Antonoff, who's up for multiple honors at this Sunday's Grammys ceremony, stopped by Seth Meyers' Late Night Tuesday to share his side of an enthralling cereal introduction tale featuring Lorde.

After mistakenly hearing Meyers refer to him as a "Moon man," Antonoff recalled the cereal moment. "We've introduced each other to a lot of things because it's a vastly different culture in New Zealand [than] the United States," he said. "I think in the United States we have a tendency to think, 'This is it.' Like, for example, I have an Italian friend and I was like, 'Italian wedding soup! The best, right?' and they were like, 'That's not a thing in Italy.'"

59402958a776f36ba663a184

Antonoff added that he grew up in "a culture where every night you would have a cereal while you watch TV," which he considered "sad" but I consider awesome. "[Lorde] didn't know Lucky Charms, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, Fruity Pebbles, just the classics," he said. "That's an absurd niche, so that was one thing I was able to show her. She taught me class, I taught her about Fruity Pebbles." As you might expect, years of classic cereal-free existence meant the window for enjoyment has probably closed. "Well, yeah, it was disgusting," Antonoff said.

Lorde detailed Antonoff's cereal lineup, which spontaneously occurred during Melodrama sessions, in an interview with Billboard last week. "I was sort of doing nothing in New York, and we did this thing where for five days in a row we just kept having dinner every night, just getting to know each other," she said. "One night, somehow it came up that I hadn't had Cap'n Crunch or Cinnamon Toast Crunch or Lucky Charms. He was like, 'We have to do this.' So we went to a bodega, got all of these cereals and went back to his house in Brooklyn and did a little lineup of bowls. We tried, like, 20 different kinds of cereal. I still think about Cinnamon Toast Crunch all the time." Same.

5991dac7f5bcb103e84eff7b

The bulk of Melodrama was recorded at that same Brooklyn house, resulting in a concise 11-track slice of inner dialogue put to tape that's now up for Album of the Year alongside Childish Gambino, Jay Z, Kendrick Lamar, and Bruno Mars.