Youthquaker

Phlo Finister: “There was this photograph of Edie Sedgwick in Vogue magazine in—I believe it was 1964, 1965. And Diana Vreeland, who was the editor of Vogue at that time, named Edie Sedgwick ‘Youthquaker.’ She got a lot of press for hanging out with Andy Warhol and they were calling her ‘Girl of the Year’ and she was a very successful model.

"It was very cool to me when I read it, like ‘Youthquaker’—this term is so relevant to today. The music, the fashion, the teenager youth-pirited stuff that’s going on —even with Fairfax and stuff and just the street wear—because Mod fashion was created in the streets and not in the couture houses.

“I thought that was so relatable, and I felt like I wanted to know more about this. When I began to study these girls and how they were so different and each of them were poster girls, I was like ‘This is so cool, and if I could recreate or make this relevant again to today’s youth, it’d be such a huge thing for this generation.’

 

It was very cool to me when I read it, like ‘Youthquaker’—this term is so relevant to today. The music, the fashion, the teenager youth-pirited stuff that’s going on —even with Fairfax and stuff and just the street wear—because Mod fashion was created in the streets and not in the couture houses.

 

“The term ‘Youthquaker’ in itself is something groundbreaking. If you think about all of the power that the youth is being permitted today it's amazing. I wanted to definitely enlighten people on that. I just studied that a lot and now I’m speaking about it publicly.

“I felt like taking that whole ’90s vibe in that era when all those girls were poster girls and they were dressing the same–I felt like for me to actually show people that. It doesn’t matter if it was in the ‘60s or the ‘90s or in the new millennium or 2012–it’s still a movement of the youth.

“I put on for Edie because she was like the underdog and I think a lot of people didn’t respect her as much in fashion. She’s not a bigger icon because she was on drugs. Her fashion sense came from her psychological disturbances.

"She never once dressed a certain way or looked a certain way because anyone put certain clothes on her or gave her an identity. That was literally her tripping out in the fashion world with all these creeps. She was really bugging out. Me noticing that and the way that I dress—the way that I dress due to the way that I feel—that’s the connection.

“She was really just a girl with a lot of problems and she had a lot of money. I love that aspect that she had a lot of money and she wasn’t happy because that just shows you it doesn’t matter if you have like all this money and all these resources, it’s never going to promise you happiness or success.”