Album: Buhloone Mindstate

Label: Tommy Boy

Prince Paul:“The third album was certainly a mixture of people, and I would say it was more by appointment than the atmosphere. It was like, ‘Oh, such and such would come in at this time.’ It was based upon how the music industry was changing. At one point, anybody could come in, lay down a rhyme, and it’s good. It became a time when, ‘Contact my manager. What’s my cut? What forms do I have to fill out?’ You know, it became a different environment.

 

Before, it was like, ‘Yo, I’m just so happy to be here. Let’s just bug out. Money? What’s that? We’re just happy to be making records.’ As time went on, those things became different.

 

"Now when you walk in, which rightfully so, you hear how much you’re getting paid, what’s the split, talk to my man, here’s his number. You can talk to my man, and we’ll work it out. Whereas, before, it was like, ‘Yo, I’m just so happy to be here. Let’s just bug out. Money? What’s that? We’re just happy to be making records.’ As time went on, those things became different. We had such and such people in there, usually they were fans of De La, but a lot of business was involved in it as well.

“Yeah, I remember meeting them in Japan when I traveled to De La to Japan. And they so happened to be in town at the time. So you know De La, they keep in touch with everybody. They were like, ‘Yo, guess who’s in town?’ And I was like, ‘Yo, let’s record them.’

"So we had a beat looped up, and we had them rhyme on it, and I wanted to make that to the intro for the album. And De La cats were like, ‘Nah, nah, people are going to think we’re silly.’ It was interesting because a lot of people haven’t heard of Japanese rap back then. It was somewhat an introduction to heads that hip-hop was bigger than just the United States.’”